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Titolo:
Encephalitis due to a free-living amoeba (Balamuthia mandrillaris): Case report with literature review
Autore:
Deol, I; Robledo, L; Meza, A; Visvesvara, GS; Andrews, RJ;
Indirizzi:
Texas Tech Univ, Hlth Sci Ctr, Div Neurosurg, El Paso, TX 79905 USA Texas Tech Univ El Paso TX USA 79905 Div Neurosurg, El Paso, TX 79905 USA Texas Tech Univ, Hlth Sci Ctr, Dept Pathol, El Paso, TX 79905 USA Texas Tech Univ El Paso TX USA 79905 , Dept Pathol, El Paso, TX 79905 USA Texas Tech Univ, Hlth Sci Ctr, Dept Surg, El Paso, TX 79905 USA Texas TechUniv El Paso TX USA 79905 tr, Dept Surg, El Paso, TX 79905 USA Texas Tech Univ, Hlth Sci Ctr, Dept Internal Med, El Paso, TX 79905 USA Texas Tech Univ El Paso TX USA 79905 Internal Med, El Paso, TX 79905 USA Ctr Dis Control & Prevent, Div Parasit Dis, Atlanta, GA USA Ctr Dis Control & Prevent Atlanta GA USA iv Parasit Dis, Atlanta, GA USA
Titolo Testata:
SURGICAL NEUROLOGY
fascicolo: 6, volume: 53, anno: 2000,
pagine: 611 - 616
SICI:
0090-3019(200006)53:6<611:EDTAFA>2.0.ZU;2-9
Fonte:
ISI
Lingua:
ENG
Soggetto:
GRANULOMATOUS AMEBIC ENCEPHALITIS; CENTRAL-NERVOUS-SYSTEM; LEPTOMYXID-AMEBA; NEUROIMAGING FINDINGS; OPPORTUNISTIC AMEBAS; ACANTHAMOEBA; MENINGOENCEPHALITIS; INFECTIONS; PATIENT; ANIMALS;
Keywords:
amebiasis; encephalitis; granulomatous infection (chronic); parasites;
Tipo documento:
Review
Natura:
Periodico
Settore Disciplinare:
Clinical Medicine
Citazioni:
27
Recensione:
Indirizzi per estratti:
Indirizzo: Andrews, RJ Texas Tech Univ, Hlth Sci Ctr, Div Neurosurg, 4800 Alberta Ava, El Paso, TX 79905 USA Texas Tech Univ 4800 Alberta Ava El Paso TX USA 79905 9905 USA
Citazione:
I. Deol et al., "Encephalitis due to a free-living amoeba (Balamuthia mandrillaris): Case report with literature review", SURG NEUROL, 53(6), 2000, pp. 611-616

Abstract

BACKGROUNDAmebic infections can spread to the central nervous system with a lengthy but usually fatal course. A typical case is presented to raise awareness ofthis increasingly reported infectious process that may have a more favorable outcome if diagnosed in its early stages. CASE DESCRIPTIONA 38-year-old male presented with an ulcerating 10 x 8 cm mass on his thigh and smaller skin nodules. In less than 6 months seizures developed due togranulomatous lesions of the brain. Biopsies/excisions of the thigh lesion, a subcutaneous nodule, and a brain lesion were performed. Ile failed to respond to broad spectrum antibiotics and antineoplastic agents, and died within 6 weeks of the initial MRI scan of the brain. Rare amebic trophozoites were appreciated in the biopsy specimens on post-mortem review, and Balamuthia mandrillaris confirmed as the infecting agenton immunofluorescence studies. CONCLUSIONSGranulomatous amebic encephalitis is a parasitic infection with a lengthy clinical course before rapid deterioration due to extensive brain lesions is noted. Either early treatment with antimicrobials or-in rare cases-excision of the brain lesion(s) may offer the chance of a cure. (C) 2000 by Elsevier Science Inc.

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Documento generato il 06/04/20 alle ore 01:17:14