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Titolo:
DNA damage-induced mutation: tolerance via translesion synthesis
Autore:
Kunz, BA; Straffon, AFL; Vonarx, EJ;
Indirizzi:
Deakin Univ, Sch Biol & Chem Sci, Geelong, Vic 3217, Australia Deakin Univ Geelong Vic Australia 3217 Sci, Geelong, Vic 3217, Australia
Titolo Testata:
MUTATION RESEARCH-FUNDAMENTAL AND MOLECULAR MECHANISMS OF MUTAGENESIS
fascicolo: 1-2, volume: 451, anno: 2000,
pagine: 169 - 185
SICI:
1386-1964(20000630)451:1-2<169:DDMTVT>2.0.ZU;2-A
Fonte:
ISI
Lingua:
ENG
Soggetto:
XERODERMA-PIGMENTOSUM VARIANT; UBIQUITIN-CONJUGATING-ENZYME; BASE-EXCISION-REPAIR; ESCHERICHIA-COLI DINB; SACCHAROMYCES-CEREVISIAE GENE; APURINIC APYRIMIDINIC SITES; SIMPLE REPETITIVE SEQUENCES; THYMINE-THYMINE DIMER; HUMAN CELL-EXTRACTS; SINGLE ABASIC SITE;
Keywords:
DNA damage; translesion synthesis; DNA polymerase eta; DNA polymerase xi; yeast; mammalian cells;
Tipo documento:
Review
Natura:
Periodico
Settore Disciplinare:
Life Sciences
Citazioni:
127
Recensione:
Indirizzi per estratti:
Indirizzo: Kunz, BA Deakin Univ, Sch Biol & Chem Sci, Geelong, Vic 3217, Australia Deakin Univ Geelong Vic Australia 3217 long, Vic 3217, Australia
Citazione:
B.A. Kunz et al., "DNA damage-induced mutation: tolerance via translesion synthesis", MUT RES-F M, 451(1-2), 2000, pp. 169-185

Abstract

Translesion synthesis (TLS) appears to be required for most damage-inducedmutagenesis in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, whether the damage arises from endogenous or exogenous sources. Thus, the production of such mutations seems to occur primarily as a consequence of the tolerance of DNA lesions rather than an error-prone repair mechanism. Tolerance via TLS in yeastinvolves proteins encoded by members of the RAD6 epistasis group for the repair of ultraviolet (UV) photoproducts, in particular two non-essential DNA polymerases that catalyse error-free or error-prone TLS. Homologues of these RAD6 group proteins have recently been discovered in rodent and/or human cells. Furthermore, the operation of error-free TLS in humans has been linked to a reduced risk of W-induced skin cancer, whereas mutations generated by error-prone TLS may increase the risk of cancer. In this article, we review and link the evidence for translesion synthesis in yeast and the involvement of nonreplicative DNA polymerases, to recent findings in mammalian cells. (C) 2000 Elsevier Science B.V. All rights reserved.

ASDD Area Sistemi Dipartimentali e Documentali, Università di Bologna, Catalogo delle riviste ed altri periodici
Documento generato il 05/12/20 alle ore 01:25:35