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Titolo:
Organ donors with primary central nervous system tumor
Autore:
Detry, O; Honore, P; Hans, MF; Delbouille, MH; Jacquet, N; Meurisse, M;
Indirizzi:
Univ Hosp Liege, CHU Sart Tilman B35, Dept Surg & Transplantat, B-4000 Liege, Belgium Univ Hosp Liege Liege Belgium B-4000 Transplantat, B-4000 Liege, Belgium
Titolo Testata:
TRANSPLANTATION
fascicolo: 1, volume: 70, anno: 2000,
pagine: 244 - 248
SICI:
0041-1337(20000715)70:1<244:ODWPCN>2.0.ZU;2-2
Fonte:
ISI
Lingua:
ENG
Soggetto:
GLIOBLASTOMA-MULTIFORME; VENTRICULOPERITONEAL SHUNT; MALIGNANCY TRANSPLANTATION; LIVER-TRANSPLANTATION; CELL-GROWTH; TRANSMISSION; CANCER; GRAFT; CYCLOSPORINE; METASTASIS;
Tipo documento:
Article
Natura:
Periodico
Settore Disciplinare:
Life Sciences
Citazioni:
39
Recensione:
Indirizzi per estratti:
Indirizzo: Detry, O CHU Sart Tilman, Dept Transplantat, B-4000 Liege, Belgium CHU Sart Tilman Liege Belgium B-4000 tat, B-4000 Liege, Belgium
Citazione:
O. Detry et al., "Organ donors with primary central nervous system tumor", TRANSPLANT, 70(1), 2000, pp. 244-248

Abstract

Patients with primary central nervous system (CNS) tumor have been accepted for organ donation because these tumors very rarely spread outside the CNS. However several case reports of CNS tumor transferral with organ transplantation recently challenged this attitude. Some risk factors for extraneural spread of CNS tumors have been determined, but the absence of risk factors does not exclude the possibility of metastases. To our knowledge, 13 cases of CNS tumor transferral with organ transplantation (one heart, three livers, eight kidneys, one kidney/pancreas) have been reported in the literature. Even if no prospective evaluation of the CNS tumor transmission risk with transplantation has been undergone, this risk may be estimated between a little more than 0% and 3% from retrospective series. The authors consider that patients with CNS tumor should be accepted as donors as long as the risk of dying on the waiting Lists is significantly higher than the tumor transferral risk. Therefore the authors would have no restriction for transplanting organs from donors with benign or low-grade CNS tumor. For high-grade tumors, the authors would consider these donors as "marginal donors," and balance the risk of tumor transmission with the medical condition of the recipient.

ASDD Area Sistemi Dipartimentali e Documentali, Università di Bologna, Catalogo delle riviste ed altri periodici
Documento generato il 29/03/20 alle ore 09:33:29