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Titolo:
Pattern vision of the honeybee (Apis mellifera). What is an oriented edge?
Autore:
Horridge, A;
Indirizzi:
Australian Natl Univ, Res Sch Biol Sci, Ctr Visual Sci, Canberra, ACT 2601, Australia Australian Natl Univ Canberra ACT Australia 2601 rra, ACT 2601, Australia
Titolo Testata:
JOURNAL OF COMPARATIVE PHYSIOLOGY A-SENSORY NEURAL AND BEHAVIORAL PHYSIOLOGY
fascicolo: 6, volume: 186, anno: 2000,
pagine: 521 - 534
SICI:
0340-7594(200006)186:6<521:PVOTH(>2.0.ZU;2-1
Fonte:
ISI
Lingua:
ENG
Soggetto:
EQUAL ORTHOGONAL BARS; CHROMATIC PROPERTIES; 2 PAIRS; DISCRIMINATION; ORIENTATION; RECOGNITION; CELLS; MEDULLA; LOCUST; COLOR;
Keywords:
honeybee; vision; edge orientation; filters;
Tipo documento:
Article
Natura:
Periodico
Settore Disciplinare:
Life Sciences
Citazioni:
38
Recensione:
Indirizzi per estratti:
Indirizzo: Horridge, A Australian Natl Univ, Res Sch Biol Sci, Ctr Visual Sci, POB 475, Canberra,ACT 2601, Australia Australian Natl Univ POB 475 Canberra ACT Australia 2601 ralia
Citazione:
A. Horridge, "Pattern vision of the honeybee (Apis mellifera). What is an oriented edge?", J COMP PH A, 186(6), 2000, pp. 521-534

Abstract

Pairs of black patterns on a white background, one rewarded the other not,were presented vertically each in one arm of a Y-maze. During training thelocations of the black areas were changed every 5 min to prevent the bees using them as cues, but cues from edges were kept consistent. Bees detect orientation even in a gradient that subtends 36 degrees from black to white (normal to the edge). Orientation cues in short lengths of edge are detected and summed on each side of the fixation point, irrespective of the lay-out of the pattern. Edges at right angles reduce the total orientation cue. The polarity of edges in a sawtooth grating is weakly discriminated, but notthe orientation of a fault line where two gratings meet. Edge quality can be discriminated, but is not recognised in unfamiliar orientations. When spot location is excluded as a cue, the orientation of a row of spots or squares which individually provide no net orientation cue is not discriminated. In conclusion, when locations of black areas are shuffled, the bees remember the sum of local orientation cues but not the global pattern, and there is no re-assembly of a pattern based on differently oriented edges. A neuronal model consistent with these results is presented.

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Documento generato il 16/07/20 alle ore 05:59:07