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Titolo:
Prenatal viral infection causes alterations in nNOS expression in developing mouse brains
Autore:
Fatemi, SH; Cuadra, AE; El-Fakahany, EE; Sidwell, RW; Thuras, P;
Indirizzi:
Univ Minnesota, Sch Med, Dept Psychiat, Div Neurosci Res, Minneapolis, MN 55455 USA Univ Minnesota Minneapolis MN USA 55455 ci Res, Minneapolis, MN 55455 USA Utah State Univ, Inst Antiviral Res, Logan, UT 84322 USA Utah State Univ Logan UT USA 84322 nst Antiviral Res, Logan, UT 84322 USA
Titolo Testata:
NEUROREPORT
fascicolo: 7, volume: 11, anno: 2000,
pagine: 1493 - 1496
SICI:
0959-4965(20000515)11:7<1493:PVICAI>2.0.ZU;2-V
Fonte:
ISI
Lingua:
ENG
Soggetto:
NITRIC-OXIDE SYNTHASE; NEONATAL MICE; IN-UTERO; INFLUENZA; SCHIZOPHRENIA; HIPPOCAMPI; INDUCTION; EXPOSURE; CELLS; NOS;
Keywords:
human influenza; neuronal nitric oxide synthase; neurotoxicity; prenatal; schizophrenia;
Tipo documento:
Article
Natura:
Periodico
Settore Disciplinare:
Life Sciences
Citazioni:
24
Recensione:
Indirizzi per estratti:
Indirizzo: Fatemi, SH Univ Minnesota, Sch Med, Dept Psychiat, Div Neurosci Res, Box 392 Mayo Bldg,420 Delaware St SE, Minneapolis, MN 55455 USA Univ Minnesota Box 392 Mayo Bldg,420 Delaware St SE Minneapolis MN USA 55455
Citazione:
S.H. Fatemi et al., "Prenatal viral infection causes alterations in nNOS expression in developing mouse brains", NEUROREPORT, 11(7), 2000, pp. 1493-1496

Abstract

Epidemiological evidence points to prenatal viral infection being responsible for some forms of schizophrenia and autism. We hypothesized that prenatal human influenza viral infection in day 9 pregnant mice may cause changesin the levels of neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS), an important molecule involved in synaptogenesis and excitotoxicity, in neonatal brains. Brains from 35- and 56-day-old mice were prepared for SDS-gel electrophoresis and Western blotting using polyclonal anti nNOS antibody. Quantification of nNOS showed time and region-dependent changes in the levels of nNOS protein. Mean rostral brain area value from prenatally infected animals showed a significant (p = 0.067) increase of 147% in nNOS levels at 35 days postnatally, with an eventual 29% decrease on day 56. Middle and caudal brain areas showed reductions in nNOS in experimental mice at 35 and 56 days, with a significant 27% decrease in nNOS in the middle segment of day 56 brains (p = 0.016). Significant interactions were found between group membership and brain area (Wilks lambda = 0.440, F(2.9)= 5.72, p = 0.025); there was also a significant interaction between brain area, group and age (Wilks lambda = 0.437, F(2.9) = 5.79, P = 0.024). These results provide further support for the notion that prenatal viral infection affects brain development adversely via the pathological involvement of nNOS expression. NeuroReport 11:1493-1496 (C) 2000 Lippincott Williams & Wilkins.

ASDD Area Sistemi Dipartimentali e Documentali, Università di Bologna, Catalogo delle riviste ed altri periodici
Documento generato il 07/07/20 alle ore 20:58:33