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Titolo:
Male prevalence for reading disability is found in a large sample of Blackand White children free from ascertainment bias
Autore:
Flannery, KA; Liederman, J; Daly, L; Schultz, J;
Indirizzi:
Boston Univ, Brain Behav & Cognit Program, Boston, MA 02215 USA Boston Univ Boston MA USA 02215 av & Cognit Program, Boston, MA 02215 USA St Anselms Coll, Manchester, NH 03102 USA St Anselms Coll Manchester NH USA 03102 ms Coll, Manchester, NH 03102 USA
Titolo Testata:
JOURNAL OF THE INTERNATIONAL NEUROPSYCHOLOGICAL SOCIETY
fascicolo: 4, volume: 6, anno: 2000,
pagine: 433 - 442
SICI:
1355-6177(200005)6:4<433:MPFRDI>2.0.ZU;2-3
Fonte:
ISI
Lingua:
ENG
Soggetto:
CEREBRAL LATERALIZATION; BIOLOGICAL MECHANISMS; GENDER DIFFERENCES; SEX-DIFFERENCES; DYSLEXIA; ASSOCIATIONS; RETARDATION; HYPOTHESIS; PATHOLOGY; PROGRAM;
Keywords:
dyslexia; sex differences; sex ratio; reading disability; learning disability;
Tipo documento:
Article
Natura:
Periodico
Settore Disciplinare:
Clinical Medicine
Citazioni:
38
Recensione:
Indirizzi per estratti:
Indirizzo: Liederman, J Boston Univ, Brain Behav & Cognit Program, 64 Cummington St, Boston, MA 02215 USA Boston Univ 64 Cummington St Boston MA USA 02215 MA 02215 USA
Citazione:
K.A. Flannery et al., "Male prevalence for reading disability is found in a large sample of Blackand White children free from ascertainment bias", J INT NEURO, 6(4), 2000, pp. 433-442

Abstract

Male vulnerability to neurodevelopmental disorders remains controversial. For one disorder, reading disability, this sex bias has been interpreted asan artifact of referral bias. We investigated sex differences for the incidence of reading disability within a large prospective sample of White (N =16,910) and Black (N = 15,313) children derived from the National Collaborative Perinatal Project (NCPP). Children were classified as having either moderate or severe reading disability when they had reading scores lower than 1.5 or 2.0 standard errors of prediction, respectively, given their age and intelligence. Reading disability was about twice as common in boys than girls (p < .001), irrespective of race, severity of disability, or exclusion of children with attentional disturbances or high activity levels. We conclude that there is a clear sex bias toward males for the incidence of reading disabilities.

ASDD Area Sistemi Dipartimentali e Documentali, Università di Bologna, Catalogo delle riviste ed altri periodici
Documento generato il 05/04/20 alle ore 19:33:42