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Titolo:
P rats develop physical dependence on alcohol via voluntary drinking: Changes in seizure thresholds, anxiety, and patterns of alcohol drinking
Autore:
Kampov-Polevoy, AB; Matthews, DB; Gause, L; Morrow, AL; Overstreet, DH;
Indirizzi:
Univ N Carolina, Bowles Ctr Alcohol Studies, Sch Med, Chapel Hill, NC 27599 USA Univ N Carolina Chapel Hill NC USA 27599 h Med, Chapel Hill, NC 27599 USA Univ N Carolina, Dept Psychiat, Sch Med, Chapel Hill, NC 27599 USA Univ N Carolina Chapel Hill NC USA 27599 h Med, Chapel Hill, NC 27599 USA Univ N Carolina, Dept Pharmacol, Sch Med, Chapel Hill, NC 27599 USA Univ NCarolina Chapel Hill NC USA 27599 h Med, Chapel Hill, NC 27599 USA
Titolo Testata:
ALCOHOLISM-CLINICAL AND EXPERIMENTAL RESEARCH
fascicolo: 3, volume: 24, anno: 2000,
pagine: 278 - 284
SICI:
0145-6008(200003)24:3<278:PRDPDO>2.0.ZU;2-G
Fonte:
ISI
Lingua:
ENG
Soggetto:
GAMMA-AMINOBUTYRIC-ACID; ETHANOL WITHDRAWAL; REVERSES; INTOXICATION; INHALATION; ANTAGONIST; FLUMAZENIL; RECEPTORS; INDUCTION; BLOCKADE;
Keywords:
P rats; alcohol withdrawal; bicuculline; anxiety;
Tipo documento:
Article
Natura:
Periodico
Settore Disciplinare:
Clinical Medicine
Life Sciences
Citazioni:
29
Recensione:
Indirizzi per estratti:
Indirizzo: Overstreet, DH Univ N Carolina, Bowles Ctr Alcohol Studies, Sch Med, CB 7178,3011 Thurston Bowles Bldg, Chapel Hill, NC 27599 USA Univ N Carolina CB 7178,3011 Thurston Bowles Bldg Chapel Hill NC USA 27599
Citazione:
A.B. Kampov-Polevoy et al., "P rats develop physical dependence on alcohol via voluntary drinking: Changes in seizure thresholds, anxiety, and patterns of alcohol drinking", ALC CLIN EX, 24(3), 2000, pp. 278-284

Abstract

Background: It has been proposed that the alcohol-preferring P rat meets many of the criteria for an animal model of alcoholism. However, the development of alcohol dependence has not been explored in rats that self-administer ethanol for less than 15-20 weeks. The present study investigated the development of physical dependence upon alcohol after 2-6 weeks of voluntary alcohol intake. Changes in bicuculline-induced seizure thresholds, microstructure of alcohol drinking, and anxiety-related behavior were used as indices of alcohol dependence. In addition, we evaluated the microstructure of alcohol drinking associated with the development of physical dependence uponalcohol. Methods: Alcohol (10% ethanol solution) was measured in graduated drinkingtubes with both alcohol and water available continuously. Microstructure of alcohol intake was monitored by a computerized drinkometer. Physical dependence upon alcohol was determined by measuring bicuculline-induced seizurethresholds after alcohol withdrawal. Anxiety-related behavior of P rats after alcohol withdrawal was determined by the social interaction and elevated plus maze tests. Results: Initial alcohol intake in the alcohol-preferring P rat was relatively modest (3.9 +/- 0.4 g/kg/day). Four days of forced alcohol exposure (initiation) followed by 6 weeks of voluntary drinking resulted in an increase of alcohol intake to 5.5 +/- 0.2 g/kg/day. Ethanol self-administration for 6 weeks, but not for 2 or 4 weeks, produced a significant reduction (30%;p < 0.05) in bicuculline-induced seizure thresholds during alcohol withdrawal. Alterations in the microstructure of alcohol intake (i.e., 90% increase in the size of alcohol drinking bouts compared to the baseline [p < 0.001] with no change in bout frequency) were associated with the development ofalcohol dependence. Termination of alcohol intake after 6 weeks of voluntary alcohol consumption resulted in increased anxiety according to both the social interaction and elevated plus maze tests. Conclusions: The results of this study indicate that 6 weeks of voluntary alcohol intake are sufficient for the development of physical dependence upon alcohol in the alcohol-preferring P rats as measured by susceptibility to bicuculline-induced seizures. This lime is much shorter than the 15-20 weeks reported earlier. Development of physical dependence to alcohol was associated with an increase in daily alcohol intake (40% over the baseline), an increase in alcohol intake during each drinking bout (90% over the baseline), and elevated anxiety during alcohol withdrawal.

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Documento generato il 10/07/20 alle ore 12:01:42