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Titolo:
The human brain and the origins of language
Autore:
Habib, M; Joanette, Y; Lecours, AR;
Indirizzi:
CHU Timone, Hop Marseille, F-13385 Marseille 5, France CHU Timone Marseille France 5 Hop Marseille, F-13385 Marseille 5, France
Titolo Testata:
M S-MEDECINE SCIENCES
fascicolo: 2, volume: 16, anno: 2000,
pagine: 171 - 180
SICI:
0767-0974(200002)16:2<171:THBATO>2.0.ZU;2-F
Fonte:
ISI
Lingua:
FRE
Soggetto:
SPECIES-SPECIFIC VOCALIZATIONS; HUMAN CORPUS-CALLOSUM; PLANUM TEMPORALE; CEREBRAL LATERALIZATION; ASYMMETRIES; MORPHOLOGY; HANDEDNESS; TESTOSTERONE; PERCEPTION; DYSLEXIA;
Tipo documento:
Article
Natura:
Periodico
Settore Disciplinare:
Life Sciences
Citazioni:
49
Recensione:
Indirizzi per estratti:
Indirizzo: Joanette, Y CHU Timone, Hop Marseille, Blvd Jean Moulin, F-13385 Marseille5, France CHU Timone Blvd Jean Moulin Marseille France 5 ille 5, France
Citazione:
M. Habib et al., "The human brain and the origins of language", M S-MED SCI, 16(2), 2000, pp. 171-180

Abstract

At the turn of the century, the issue of the origins of human language still remains one of the most attractive challenges for neuroscientists and neurologists. This article proposes an overview of various pieces of evidence, derived from - mostly recent - anatomical, physiological as well as clinical research. After a short recall of classical anatomical concepts about the brain language areas, and an illustration of advances to these classicalconceptions provided by new imaging techniques, the central issue of brainlateralisation is taken as a basis for a reflection about the phylogeneticand paleontological origins of human language. One important conclusion tothis section is that anterior and posterior parts of the language area, i.e. respectively its expressive and receptive components, probably differ intheir origins. In particular, motor aspects of speech, as exemplified in recent brain imaging studies in deaf subjects, seem to be a necessary condition to a plain left lateralization of language. Development of brain/language relationship during the child's maturation is also a valuable source of information. Insights into the brain development have been derived from several approaches the study of myelinogenesis, which offers a reliable timetable of the relative growth of different brain areas; development, mainly during late fetal life, of brain asymmetry, which is thought to be crucial tosetting up the pattern of language lateralization. Finally, one brain structure, the corpus callosum, clearly measurable on magnetic resonance (MR) pictures, appears as a very useful index of the potential role of various factors on brain maturation, including the effect of practice and training, now believed to be at least as effective as prenatal influences in determining the morphology of language-related brain regions. Finally, clinical and imaging studies language-learning disorders in children has been one of themost fruitful approaches, in the recent years, yielding considerable insight into the cognitive, biological and genetic bases of human language. Functional brain imaging in these conditions has recently contributed in important ways to the knowledge of brain mechanisms involved in processing written language.

ASDD Area Sistemi Dipartimentali e Documentali, Università di Bologna, Catalogo delle riviste ed altri periodici
Documento generato il 29/02/20 alle ore 14:56:12