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Titolo:
The evolution of non-maternal care in anthropoid primates: A test of the hypotheses
Autore:
Ross, C; MacLarnon, A;
Indirizzi:
Univ Surrey Roehampton, Sch Life Sci, London SW15 3SN, England Univ SurreyRoehampton London England SW15 3SN London SW15 3SN, England
Titolo Testata:
FOLIA PRIMATOLOGICA
fascicolo: 1-2, volume: 71, anno: 2000,
pagine: 93 - 113
SICI:
0015-5713(200001/04)71:1-2<93:TEONCI>2.0.ZU;2-T
Fonte:
ISI
Lingua:
ENG
Soggetto:
MARMOSET CALLITHRIX-JACCHUS; BEHAVIORAL-DEVELOPMENT; ALLOPARENTAL BEHAVIOR; VERVET MONKEYS; PATAS MONKEYS; INFANTS; CHIMPANZEES; PHYLOGENY; TAMARINS; BENEFITS;
Keywords:
allomothering; parental care; life histories; reproductive rate;
Tipo documento:
Review
Natura:
Periodico
Settore Disciplinare:
Agriculture,Biology & Environmental Sciences
Citazioni:
126
Recensione:
Indirizzi per estratti:
Indirizzo: Ross, C Univ Surrey Roehampton, Sch Life Sci, London SW15 3SN, England Univ Surrey Roehampton London England SW15 3SN SW15 3SN, England
Citazione:
C. Ross e A. MacLarnon, "The evolution of non-maternal care in anthropoid primates: A test of the hypotheses", FOL PRIMAT, 71(1-2), 2000, pp. 93-113

Abstract

The amount of non-maternal care (allocare) found in primates varies greatly from species to species. Our paper examines this variation and focuses onpossible reasons why mothers in some anthropoid primate species are prepared to relinquish their infants to other carers whereas others are not. We use data collected from the literature to test a number of hypotheses that attempt to explain the observed variation in non-maternal care. Analyses were carried out using comparative methods that control for the influence of both body size and phylogeny on life-history and ecological variation. The results support previous studies of both primates and other mammals in finding a clear link between the amount of allocare provided and female reproductive rates. Species with high allocare levels grow rapidly post-natally andwean their infants at a younger age (but at the same relative size) than species of the same body size with lower allocare levels. This early weaningallows high allocare species to support higher birth rates than low allocare species but does not result in earlier maturation. Our results, therefore, suggest that mothers allow non-maternal care of their infants in order to increase their own reproductive output. It is not clear whether such a strategy also benefits the infant, as we could find no link between the presence of allocare and early maturation (which would increase the infant's reproductive output) or between allocare levels and infant survival (as measured by vulnerability to infanticide). This suggests that mothers and infantsmight come into conflict over transfer to other carers, as the benefits tothe mother may not be accompanied by benefits to the infant. However, although mothers may benefit from allocare in some circumstances, they will notbe expected to allow allocare if the costs are high (e.g. if there is a high risk to the infant). Copyright (C) 2000 S. Karger AG, Basel.

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Documento generato il 04/04/20 alle ore 02:41:07