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Titolo:
Inferior vena caval injury in the firearm era
Autore:
Clarke, DL; Madiba, TE; Muckart, DJJ;
Indirizzi:
Univ Natal, Dept Surg, Durban, South Africa Univ Natal Durban South Africa v Natal, Dept Surg, Durban, South Africa
Titolo Testata:
SOUTH AFRICAN JOURNAL OF SURGERY
fascicolo: 4, volume: 37, anno: 1999,
pagine: 107 - 109
SICI:
0038-2361(199911)37:4<107:IVCIIT>2.0.ZU;2-2
Fonte:
ISI
Lingua:
ENG
Soggetto:
PLANNED REOPERATION; TRAUMA;
Tipo documento:
Article
Natura:
Periodico
Settore Disciplinare:
Clinical Medicine
Citazioni:
16
Recensione:
Indirizzi per estratti:
Indirizzo: Clarke, DL Univ Natal, Dept Surg, Durban, South Africa Univ Natal DurbanSouth Africa pt Surg, Durban, South Africa
Citazione:
D.L. Clarke et al., "Inferior vena caval injury in the firearm era", S AFR J SUR, 37(4), 1999, pp. 107-109

Abstract

Background. This study compared the outcome of intra-abdominal caval injuries in the current era of firearm injuries with the outcome during the previous era of stab wounds. Methods. Patients with intra-abdominal vena caval injuries treated at KingEdward VIII Hospital, Durban, from December 1990 to December 1995 were reviewed. This group was compared with a similar cohort reviewed a decade earlier. Results. The historical group consisted of 28 patients and the current group of 26 patients. Modes of injury in the historical group were: stabs (15,53%), firearm injuries (7, 33%), blunt trauma (4, 14%) and iatrogenic injuries (2, 7%). Modes of injury in the current group were: stabs (5, 19%), firearm injuries (17, 65%) and blunt trauma (4, 16%). Mortality rose from 35.7% in the historical group to 88% in the current series. This mortality figure included 5 patients who died later from complications of the associatedinjuries. Conclusions. Firearm injuries are more destructive than stab wounds. The increase in firearm injuries partly explains this higher mortality. However,the failure to apply current concepts of abbreviated laparotomy and damagecontrol combined with excessive delays in transferring patients to theatrehave contributed to this high mortality.

ASDD Area Sistemi Dipartimentali e Documentali, Università di Bologna, Catalogo delle riviste ed altri periodici
Documento generato il 13/07/20 alle ore 09:30:19