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Titolo:
Ethnic enclaves and intolerance: The case of Yugoslavia
Autore:
Massey, G; Hodson, R; Sekulic, D;
Indirizzi:
Univ Wyoming, Dept Sociol, Laramie, WY 82071 USA Univ Wyoming Laramie WY USA 82071 ing, Dept Sociol, Laramie, WY 82071 USA Ohio State Univ, Columbus, OH 43210 USA Ohio State Univ Columbus OH USA 43210 State Univ, Columbus, OH 43210 USA Flinders Univ S Australia, Adelaide, SA 5001, Australia Flinders Univ S Australia Adelaide SA Australia 5001 , SA 5001, Australia
Titolo Testata:
SOCIAL FORCES
fascicolo: 2, volume: 78, anno: 1999,
pagine: 669 - 693
SICI:
0037-7732(199912)78:2<669:EEAITC>2.0.ZU;2-F
Fonte:
ISI
Lingua:
ENG
Soggetto:
FORMER YUGOSLAVIA; SOLIDARITY; ATTITUDES;
Tipo documento:
Article
Natura:
Periodico
Settore Disciplinare:
Social & Behavioral Sciences
Citazioni:
56
Recensione:
Indirizzi per estratti:
Indirizzo: Massey, G Univ Wyoming, Dept Sociol, Laramie, WY 82071 USA Univ Wyoming Laramie WY USA 82071 Sociol, Laramie, WY 82071 USA
Citazione:
G. Massey et al., "Ethnic enclaves and intolerance: The case of Yugoslavia", SOCIAL FORC, 78(2), 1999, pp. 669-693

Abstract

Differences in ethnic tolerance among majority and minority ethnic groups can be understood in part as the result of structural factors involving population arrangements and the distribution of power, especially as these aremanifest in ethnic enclaves. The current article builds on Allport's contact hypothesis in combination with propositions found in Blalock's theory ofminority-group relations and Blau's structural theory of heterogeneity andinequality to show why spatial arrangements and their corresponding power relations influence intergroup feelings of tolerance. A model of tolerance within and outside enclaves is proposed and tested using survey data (N = 13,442) from the former Yugoslavia collected in 1989-90, just before the country's dissolution. Intolerance is greatest in ethnic enclaves for both minority and majority group members. Majority group members living in enclavesdominated by a minority group are, through a combination of resentment andrestraint on their power, more intolerant than in any other situation. Minority group members living in enclaves and experiencing both nascent power and anxiety in their minority status are more intolerant than when living dispersed among majority populations. Greater attention to the role of enclaves is important for advancing social science understandings of ethnic and racial separatism and integration in multiethnic societies. In the case of the former Yugoslavia, policies that seek harmony by accepting ethnic separation may be sowing future conflict.

ASDD Area Sistemi Dipartimentali e Documentali, Università di Bologna, Catalogo delle riviste ed altri periodici
Documento generato il 29/03/20 alle ore 15:43:19