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Titolo:
Activity of smooth pursuit-related neurons in the monkey periarcuate cortex during pursuit and passive whole-body rotation
Autore:
Fukushima, K; Sato, T; Fukushima, J; Shinmei, Y; Kaneko, CRS;
Indirizzi:
Hokkaido Univ, Sch Med, Dept Physiol, Sapporo, Hokkaido 0608638, Japan Hokkaido Univ Sapporo Hokkaido Japan 0608638 oro, Hokkaido 0608638, Japan Univ Washington, Dept Physiol & Biophys, Seattle, WA 98195 USA Univ Washington Seattle WA USA 98195 iol & Biophys, Seattle, WA 98195 USA Univ Washington, Reg Primate Res Ctr, Seattle, WA 98195 USA Univ Washington Seattle WA USA 98195 imate Res Ctr, Seattle, WA 98195 USA
Titolo Testata:
JOURNAL OF NEUROPHYSIOLOGY
fascicolo: 1, volume: 83, anno: 2000,
pagine: 563 - 587
SICI:
0022-3077(200001)83:1<563:AOSPNI>2.0.ZU;2-W
Fonte:
ISI
Lingua:
ENG
Soggetto:
FRONTAL EYE FIELD; OCULAR FOLLOWING RESPONSES; VISUAL-TRACKING NEURONS; POSTERIOR PARIETAL CORTEX; CAUDAL FASTIGIAL NUCLEUS; VERMAL PURKINJE-CELLS; CORTICAL AREA MST; VESTIBULOOCULAR REFLEX; ALERT MONKEY; MOVEMENT SUBREGIONS;
Tipo documento:
Article
Natura:
Periodico
Settore Disciplinare:
Life Sciences
Citazioni:
57
Recensione:
Indirizzi per estratti:
Indirizzo: Fukushima, K Hokkaido Univ, Sch Med, Dept Physiol, W 7,N 15, Sapporo, Hokkaido 0608638,Japan Hokkaido Univ W 7,N 15 Sapporo Hokkaido Japan 0608638 8,Japan
Citazione:
K. Fukushima et al., "Activity of smooth pursuit-related neurons in the monkey periarcuate cortex during pursuit and passive whole-body rotation", J NEUROPHYS, 83(1), 2000, pp. 563-587

Abstract

Smooth pursuit and vestibularly induced eye movements interact to maintainthe accuracy of eye movements in space (i.e., gaze). To understand the role played by the frontal eye fields in pursuit-vestibular interactions, we examined activity of 110 neurons in the periarcuate areas of head-stabilizedJapanese monkeys during pursuit eye movements and passive whole-body rotation. The majority (92%) responded with the peak of their modulation near peak stimulus velocity during suppression of the vestibuloocular reflex (VOR)when the monkeys tracked a target that moved with the same amplitude and phase and in the same plane as the chair. We classified pursuit-related neurons (n = 100) as gaze velocity if their peak modulation occurred for eye (pursuit) and head (VOR suppression) movements in the same direction; the amplitude of modulation during one less than twice that of the other; and modulation was lower during target-stationary-in-space condition (VOR x1) than during VOR suppression. In addition, we examined responses during VOR enhancement (x2) in which the target moved with equal amplitude as, but oppositedirection to, the chair. Gaze-velocity neurons responded maximally for opposite directions during VOR x2 and suppression. Based on these criteria, the majority of pursuit-related neurons (66%) were classified as gaze-velocity with preferred directions uniformly distributed. Because the majority of the remaining cells (32/34) also responded during VOR suppression, they were classified as eye/head-velocity neurons. Thirteen preferred pursuit and VOR suppression in the same direction; 13 in the opposite direction, and 6 showed biphasic modulation during VOR suppression. Eye- and gaze-velocity sensitivity of the two groups of cells were similar; mean (+/- SD) was 0.53 +/- 0.30 and 0.50 +/- 0.44 spikes/s per degrees/s, respectively. Gaze-velocity (but not eye/head-velocity) neurons showed significant correlation between eye- and gaze-velocity sensitivity, and both groups maintained their responses when the tracking target was extinguished briefly. The majority of pur suit-related neurons (28/43 = about 65%) responded to chair rotation in complete darkness. When the monkeys fixated a stationary target, more than half of cells tested (21/40) discharged in proportion to the velocity of retinal motion of a second laser spot (mean velocity sensitivity = 0.20 +/- 0.16 spikes/s per degrees/s). Preferred directions of individual cells to the second spot were similar to those during pursuit. Visual responses to thesecond spot movement were maintained even when it was extinguished briefly. These results indicate that both retinal image- and gaze-velocity signalsare carried by single periarcuate pursuit-related neurons, suggesting thatthese signals can provide target-velocity-in-space and gaze-velocity commands during pursuit-vestibular interactions.

ASDD Area Sistemi Dipartimentali e Documentali, Università di Bologna, Catalogo delle riviste ed altri periodici
Documento generato il 31/03/20 alle ore 16:20:01