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Titolo:
Illusory spatial offset of a flash relative to a moving stimulus is causedby differential latencies for moving and flashed stimuli
Autore:
Whitney, D; Murakami, I; Cavanagh, P;
Indirizzi:
Harvard Univ, Vis Sci Lab, Cambridge, MA 02138 USA Harvard Univ CambridgeMA USA 02138 Vis Sci Lab, Cambridge, MA 02138 USA
Titolo Testata:
VISION RESEARCH
fascicolo: 2, volume: 40, anno: 2000,
pagine: 137 - 149
SICI:
0042-6989(2000)40:2<137:ISOOAF>2.0.ZU;2-5
Fonte:
ISI
Lingua:
ENG
Soggetto:
TEMPORAL INTEGRATION MECHANISM; VISUAL-MOTION PERCEPTION; APPARENT MOTION; SPATIOTEMPORAL INTEGRATION; COHERENT MOTION; REACTION-TIME; EXTRAPOLATION; INFORMATION; PERSISTENCE; VELOCITY;
Keywords:
motion extrapolation; illusory flash lag; latency; facilitation; motion perception;
Tipo documento:
Article
Natura:
Periodico
Settore Disciplinare:
Life Sciences
Citazioni:
52
Recensione:
Indirizzi per estratti:
Indirizzo: Whitney, D Harvard Univ, Vis Sci Lab, 33 Kirkland St, Cambridge, MA 02138 USA Harvard Univ 33 Kirkland St Cambridge MA USA 02138 MA 02138 USA
Citazione:
D. Whitney et al., "Illusory spatial offset of a flash relative to a moving stimulus is causedby differential latencies for moving and flashed stimuli", VISION RES, 40(2), 2000, pp. 137-149

Abstract

A flash that is presented adjacent to a continuously moving bar is perceived to lag behind the bar. One explanation for this phenomenon is that thereis a difference in the persistence of the flash and the bar. Another explanation is that the visual system compensates for the neural delays of processing visual motion information, such as the moving bar, by spatially extrapolating the bar's perceived location forward in space along its expected trajectory. Two experiments demonstrate that neither of these models is tenable. The first experiment masked the flash one video frame after its presentation. The flash was still perceived to lag behind the bar, suggesting that a difference in the persistence of the flash and bar, does not cause the apparent offset. The second experiment employed unpredictable changes in the velocity of the bar including an abrupt reversal, disappearance, acceleration, and deceleration. If the extrapolation model held, the bar would continue to be extrapolated in accordance with its initial velocity until the moment of an abrupt velocity change. The results were inconsistent with thisprediction, suggesting that there is little or no spatial compensation forthe neural delays of processing moving objects. The results support a new model of temporal facilitation for moving objects whereby the apparent flash lag is due to a latency advantage for moving over flashed stimuli. (C) 2000 Elsevier Science Ltd. All rights reserved.

ASDD Area Sistemi Dipartimentali e Documentali, Università di Bologna, Catalogo delle riviste ed altri periodici
Documento generato il 28/11/20 alle ore 04:25:29