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Titolo:
A progressive category-specific semantic deficit for non-living things
Autore:
Moss, HE; Tyler, LK;
Indirizzi:
Univ Cambridge, Ctr Speech & Language, Dept Expt Psychol, Cambridge CB2 3EB, England Univ Cambridge Cambridge England CB2 3EB hol, Cambridge CB2 3EB, England
Titolo Testata:
NEUROPSYCHOLOGIA
fascicolo: 1, volume: 38, anno: 2000,
pagine: 60 - 82
SICI:
0028-3932(2000)38:1<60:APCSDF>2.0.ZU;2-D
Fonte:
ISI
Lingua:
ENG
Soggetto:
HERPES-SIMPLEX ENCEPHALITIS; DOUBLE DISSOCIATION; BODY PARTS; MODALITY-SPECIFICITY; ALZHEIMERS-DISEASE; MEMORY IMPAIRMENT; NONLIVING THINGS; NAMING DEFICIT; NEURAL BASIS; KNOWLEDGE;
Keywords:
semantic memory; naming; comprehension; correlation; concepts;
Tipo documento:
Article
Natura:
Periodico
Settore Disciplinare:
Social & Behavioral Sciences
Life Sciences
Citazioni:
70
Recensione:
Indirizzi per estratti:
Indirizzo: Moss, HE Univ Cambridge, Ctr Speech & Language, Dept Expt Psychol, DowningSt, Cambridge CB2 3EB, England Univ Cambridge Downing St Cambridge England CB2 3EB 3EB, England
Citazione:
H.E. Moss e L.K. Tyler, "A progressive category-specific semantic deficit for non-living things", NEUROPSYCHO, 38(1), 2000, pp. 60-82

Abstract

We report a longitudinal study of a patient, ES, with a progressive degenerative disorder resulting from generalised cerebral atrophy. Across a rangeof tasks, ES showed a greater difficulty in recognising and naming artifacts than living things. This deficit for artifacts emerged over time, as shebecame more severely impaired, in one task, picture naming, there was a crossover from an initial deficit for living things to the later artifact deficit. All materials were carefully controlled to rule out potential confounding factors such as concept familiarity or age of acquisition. There was no evidence that ES's deficit for artifacts was associated with a greater loss of functional than visual information. The pattern of results are consistent with a recently proposed distributed connectionist model. in which a deficit for artifact concepts can emerge as the result of severe, general damage to semantic memory. (C) 1999 Elsevier Science Ltd. All rights reserved.

ASDD Area Sistemi Dipartimentali e Documentali, Università di Bologna, Catalogo delle riviste ed altri periodici
Documento generato il 10/07/20 alle ore 00:21:35