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Titolo:
Glycated hemoglobin as an indicator of social environmental stress among indigenous versus westernized populations
Autore:
Daniel, M; ODea, K; Rowley, KG; McDermott, R; Kelly, S;
Indirizzi:
Univ N Carolina, Sch Publ Hlth, Dept Hlth Behav & Hlth Educ, Chapel Hill, NC 27599 USA Univ N Carolina Chapel Hill NC USA 27599 Educ, Chapel Hill, NC 27599 USA Monash Univ, Dept Epidemiol & Prevent Med, Melbourne, Vic 3004, Australia Monash Univ Melbourne Vic Australia 3004 , Melbourne, Vic 3004, Australia Trop Publ Hlth Unit, Cairns, Australia Trop Publ Hlth Unit Cairns Australia Publ Hlth Unit, Cairns, Australia Univ British Columbia, Dept Hlth Care & Epidemiol, Vancouver, BC V6T 1W5, Canada Univ British Columbia Vancouver BC Canada V6T 1W5 ver, BC V6T 1W5, Canada
Titolo Testata:
PREVENTIVE MEDICINE
fascicolo: 5, volume: 29, anno: 1999,
pagine: 405 - 413
SICI:
0091-7435(199911)29:5<405:GHAAIO>2.0.ZU;2-G
Fonte:
ISI
Lingua:
ENG
Soggetto:
DEPENDENT DIABETES-MELLITUS; CATECHOLAMINE EXCRETION RATES; GLYCOSYLATED HEMOGLOBIN; ALLOSTATIC LOAD; BLOOD-PRESSURE; PSYCHOLOGICAL DISTRESS; PHYSIOLOGICAL STRESS; JOB-STRESS; HEALTH; DETERMINANTS;
Keywords:
indigenous; glycated hemoglobin; stress; psychosocial; environment; westernization;
Tipo documento:
Article
Natura:
Periodico
Settore Disciplinare:
Clinical Medicine
Citazioni:
66
Recensione:
Indirizzi per estratti:
Indirizzo: Daniel, M Univ N Carolina, Sch Publ Hlth, Dept Hlth Behav & Hlth Educ, Chapel Hill, NC 27599 USA Univ N Carolina Chapel Hill NC USA 27599 pel Hill, NC 27599 USA
Citazione:
M. Daniel et al., "Glycated hemoglobin as an indicator of social environmental stress among indigenous versus westernized populations", PREV MED, 29(5), 1999, pp. 405-413

Abstract

Background. This study assessed whether glycated hemoglobin concentration,an indicator of psychogenic stress, differs between indigenous populationsand non-indigenous reference groups. Methods. Multivariate and stratified analyses were undertaken of cross-sectional data from multi-center community-based diabetes diagnostic and risk factor screening initiatives in Canada and Australia. Population groups were Australian Aborigines (n = 116), Torres Strait Islanders (n = 156), Native Canadians (n = 155), Creek migrants to Australia (n = 117), and CaucasianAustralians (n = 67). Measurements included fasting glycated hemoglobin (HbA(1c)) concentration, fasting and 2-h post-load glucose concentrations, body mass index, waist-to-hip ratio, and demographic variables. Results. Mean HbA(1c) concentrations were greater for indigenous groups than for Creek migrants and Caucasian Australians (P < 0.0001). The covariateadjusted indigenous versus non-indigenous difference (95% CI) was 0.90 (0.58-1.22) percentage units, 18.2% higher for indigenous people, Stratified analyses indicated greater HbA(1c) for indigenous than for non-indigenous persons with normoglycemia (P = 0.009), impaired glucose tolerance (P = 0.097), and diabetes (P < 0.0001). Conclusions. HbA(1c) concentrations are greater for indigenous than for non-indigenous groups. Social changes, low control, and living conditions associated with westernization may be inherently stressful at the biological level for indigenous populations in westernized countries. (C) 1999 AmericanHealth Foundation and Academic Press.

ASDD Area Sistemi Dipartimentali e Documentali, Università di Bologna, Catalogo delle riviste ed altri periodici
Documento generato il 11/07/20 alle ore 11:14:59