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Titolo:
Unique cellular events occurring during the initial interaction of macrophages with matrix-retained or methylated aggregated low density lipoprotein (LDL) - Prolonged cell-surface contact during which LDL-cholesteryl ester hydrolysis exceeds LDL protein degradation
Autore:
Buton, X; Mamdouh, Z; Ghosh, R; Du, H; Kuriakose, G; Beatini, N; Grabowski, GA; Maxfield, FR; Tabas, I;
Indirizzi:
Columbia Univ, Dept Med, New York, NY 10032 USA Columbia Univ New York NYUSA 10032 niv, Dept Med, New York, NY 10032 USA Columbia Univ, Dept Anat & Cell Biol, New York, NY USA Columbia Univ New York NY USA v, Dept Anat & Cell Biol, New York, NY USA Cornell Univ, Weill Med Coll, Dept Biochem, New York, NY 10021 USA CornellUniv New York NY USA 10021 , Dept Biochem, New York, NY 10021 USA Childrens Hosp Res Fdn, Div Human Genet, Cincinnati, OH 45229 USA Childrens Hosp Res Fdn Cincinnati OH USA 45229 , Cincinnati, OH 45229 USA
Titolo Testata:
JOURNAL OF BIOLOGICAL CHEMISTRY
fascicolo: 45, volume: 274, anno: 1999,
pagine: 32112 - 32121
SICI:
0021-9258(19991105)274:45<32112:UCEODT>2.0.ZU;2-L
Fonte:
ISI
Lingua:
ENG
Soggetto:
RECEPTOR-MEDIATED ENDOCYTOSIS; MOUSE PERITONEAL-MACROPHAGES; HUMAN MONOCYTE-MACROPHAGES; TO-RETENTION HYPOTHESIS; COATED PIT FORMATION; SCAVENGER RECEPTOR; FRUSTRATED PHAGOCYTOSIS; ATHEROGENIC LIPOPROTEINS; ATHEROSCLEROTIC LESIONS; HUMAN-FIBROBLASTS;
Tipo documento:
Article
Natura:
Periodico
Settore Disciplinare:
Life Sciences
Citazioni:
77
Recensione:
Indirizzi per estratti:
Indirizzo: Tabas, I Columbia Univ, Dept Med, 630 W 168th St, New York, NY 10032 USA Columbia Univ 630 W 168th St New York NY USA 10032 , NY 10032 USA
Citazione:
X. Buton et al., "Unique cellular events occurring during the initial interaction of macrophages with matrix-retained or methylated aggregated low density lipoprotein (LDL) - Prolonged cell-surface contact during which LDL-cholesteryl ester hydrolysis exceeds LDL protein degradation", J BIOL CHEM, 274(45), 1999, pp. 32112-32121

Abstract

A critical event in atherogenesis is the interaction of arterial wall macrophages with subendothelial lipoproteins, Although most studies have investigated this interaction by incubating cultured macrophages with monomeric lipoproteins dissolved in media, arterial wall macrophages encounter lipoproteins that are mostly bound to subendothelial extracellular matrix, and these lipoproteins are often aggregated or fused. Herein, we utilize a specialized cell-culture system to study the initial interaction of macrophages with aggregated low density lipoprotein (LDL) bound to extracellular matrix. The aggregated LDL remains extracellular for a relatively prolonged period of time and becomes lodged in invaginations in the surface of the macrophages. As expected, the degradation of the protein moiety of the LDL was very slow. Remarkably, however, hydrolysis of the cholesteryl ester (CE) moiety of the LDL was 3-7-fold higher than that of the protein moiety, in stark contrast to the situation with receptor-mediated endocytosis of acetyl-LDL, Similar results were obtained using another experimental system in which thedegradation of aggregated LDL protein was delayed by LDL methylation rather than by retention on matrix. Additional experiments indicated the following properties of this interaction: Co) LDL-CE hydrolysis is catalyzed by lysosomal acid lipase; (b) neither scavenger receptors nor the LDL receptor appear necessary for the excess LDL-CE hydrolysis; and Cc) LDL-CE hydrolysisin this system is resistant to cellular potassium depletion, which furtherdistinguishes this process from receptor-mediated endocytosis. In summary,experimental systems specifically designed to mimic the in vivo interaction of arterial wall macrophages with subendothelial Lipoproteins have demonstrated an initial period of prolonged cell-surface contact in which CE hydrolysis exceeds protein degradation.

ASDD Area Sistemi Dipartimentali e Documentali, Università di Bologna, Catalogo delle riviste ed altri periodici
Documento generato il 20/02/20 alle ore 03:02:50