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Titolo:
Rapid morphological change in channel island deer mice
Autore:
Pergams, ORW; Ashley, MV;
Indirizzi:
Univ Illinois, Dept Biol Sci, Chicago, IL 60607 USA Univ Illinois ChicagoIL USA 60607 , Dept Biol Sci, Chicago, IL 60607 USA
Titolo Testata:
EVOLUTION
fascicolo: 5, volume: 53, anno: 1999,
pagine: 1573 - 1581
SICI:
0014-3820(199910)53:5<1573:RMCICI>2.0.ZU;2-N
Fonte:
ISI
Lingua:
ENG
Soggetto:
NATURAL-POPULATIONS; PEROMYSCUS-LEUCOPUS; P-MANICULATUS; DIFFERENTIATION; EVOLUTION; GENETICS; MOUSE;
Keywords:
California Channel Islands; discriminant function analysis; morphological change; morphometrics; Peromyscus maniculatus; temporal variation;
Tipo documento:
Article
Natura:
Periodico
Settore Disciplinare:
Agriculture,Biology & Environmental Sciences
Life Sciences
Citazioni:
46
Recensione:
Indirizzi per estratti:
Indirizzo: Ashley, MV Univ Illinois, Dept Biol Sci, 845 W Taylor St, Chicago, IL 60607 USA Univ Illinois 845 W Taylor St Chicago IL USA 60607 IL 60607 USA
Citazione:
O.R.W. Pergams e M.V. Ashley, "Rapid morphological change in channel island deer mice", EVOLUTION, 53(5), 1999, pp. 1573-1581

Abstract

Deer mice, Peromyscus maniculatus, collected over 90 years from three California Channel Islands, were examined for evidence of morphological change. Rapid morphological change has occurred in the endemic subspecies from Santa Barbara (P. m. elusus), Anacapa (P. m. anacapae), and Santa Cruz Island (P. m. santacruzae). Data were divided into two temporal classes, 1897-1941and 1955-1988. Of the 16 morphological characters measured, between five and 10 measures changed significantly (P less than or equal to 0.05) with temporal class in each subspecies, and multivariate test statistics were significant (P less than or equal to 0.05) for all three subspecies. For each subspecies, depth of braincase, total length, tail length, and hind foot length became smaller over time, except depth of braincase, which became larger in P. m. elusus. The rates of change dramatically exceed those estimated from paleontological records and are even higher than those reported in some experimental selection studies. Temporal change in two characters exceedsdifferentiation between subspecies. Although changing, each subspecies remained well differentiated, and incorporation of temporal change allowed correct classification of most specimens. Unlike nearly all previous reports of rapid evolution, the changes in these populations were not associated with a founder events or recent introductions. This study demonstrates that rapid phenotypic change can occur in long-established natural populations andtemporal stability of morphological characters in such populations, even over short evolutionary time periods, cannot be assumed.

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Documento generato il 21/09/20 alle ore 14:19:58