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Titolo:
Hippocampal formation lesions produce memory impairment in the rhesus monkey
Autore:
Beason-Held, LL; Rosene, DL; Killiany, RJ; Moss, MB;
Indirizzi:
Boston Univ, Sch Med, Dept Anat & Neurobiol, Boston, MA 02118 USA Boston Univ Boston MA USA 02118 pt Anat & Neurobiol, Boston, MA 02118 USA
Titolo Testata:
HIPPOCAMPUS
fascicolo: 5, volume: 9, anno: 1999,
pagine: 562 - 574
SICI:
1050-9631(1999)9:5<562:HFLPMI>2.0.ZU;2-S
Fonte:
ISI
Lingua:
ENG
Soggetto:
PARAHIPPOCAMPAL CORTEX; RECOGNITION MEMORY; PERIRHINAL CORTEX; IBOTENIC ACID; AMYGDALA; DAMAGE; ABLATIONS; LOCATION; CA1;
Keywords:
recognition; learning; temporal lobe; limbic system; brain;
Tipo documento:
Article
Natura:
Periodico
Settore Disciplinare:
Life Sciences
Citazioni:
42
Recensione:
Indirizzi per estratti:
Indirizzo: Rosene, DL Boston Univ, Sch Med, Dept Anat & Neurobiol, 715 Albany St,W-701, Boston, MA 02118 USA Boston Univ 715 Albany St,W-701 Boston MA USA 02118A 02118 USA
Citazione:
L.L. Beason-Held et al., "Hippocampal formation lesions produce memory impairment in the rhesus monkey", HIPPOCAMPUS, 9(5), 1999, pp. 562-574

Abstract

There is much debate over the role of temporal lobe structures In the ability to learn and retain new information. To further assess the contributions of the hippocampal formation (HF), five rhesus monkeys received stereotactically placed ibotenic acid lesions of this region without involvement of surrounding ventromedial temporal cortices. After surgery, the animals weretrained on two recognition memory tasks: the Delayed Non-Match to Sample (DNMS) task, which tests the ability to remember specific trial unique stimuli, and the Delayed Recognition Span Task (DRST), which tests the ability to remember an increasing array of stimuli. Relative to normal control monkeys, those with HF lesions demonstrated significant impairments in both learning and memory stages of the DNMS task. Additionally, the HF group was significantly impaired on spatial, color, and object versions of the DRST. Contrary to suggestions that damage to the entorhinal and parahippocampal cortices is required to produce significant behavioral deficits in the monkey, these results demonstrate that selective damage to the HF is sufficient to produce impairments on tasks involving delayed recognition and memory load. This finding illustrates the importance of the HF in the acquisition and retention of new information. (C) 1999 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

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Documento generato il 01/04/20 alle ore 00:56:54