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Titolo:
The moderating role of task characteristics in determining responses to a stressful work simulation
Autore:
Jimmieson, NL; Terry, DJ;
Indirizzi:
Queensland Univ Technol, Sch Management, Brisbane, Qld 4001, Australia Queensland Univ Technol Brisbane Qld Australia 4001 , Qld 4001, Australia Univ Queensland, Sch Psychol, St Lucia, Qld 4067, Australia Univ Queensland St Lucia Qld Australia 4067 St Lucia, Qld 4067, Australia
Titolo Testata:
JOURNAL OF ORGANIZATIONAL BEHAVIOR
fascicolo: 5, volume: 20, anno: 1999,
pagine: 709 - 736
SICI:
0894-3796(199909)20:5<709:TMROTC>2.0.ZU;2-1
Fonte:
ISI
Lingua:
ENG
Soggetto:
DEMAND-DISCRETION MODEL; JOB DEMANDS; OCCUPATIONAL STRESS; SOCIAL SUPPORT; DECISION LATITUDE; PERCEIVED CONTROL; PERSONAL CONTROL; FIELD EXPERIMENT; UNITED-STATES; MENTAL STRAIN;
Tipo documento:
Article
Natura:
Periodico
Settore Disciplinare:
Social & Behavioral Sciences
Citazioni:
87
Recensione:
Indirizzi per estratti:
Indirizzo: Jimmieson, NL Queensland Univ Technol, Sch Management, Brisbane, Qld 4001,Australia Queensland Univ Technol Brisbane Qld Australia 4001 stralia
Citazione:
N.L. Jimmieson e D.J. Terry, "The moderating role of task characteristics in determining responses to a stressful work simulation", J ORG BEHAV, 20(5), 1999, pp. 709-736

Abstract

Two experimental studies were conducted to examine whether the stress-buffering effects of behavioral control on work task responses varied as a function of procedural information. Study 1 manipulated low and high levels of task demands, behavioral control, and procedural information for 128 introductory psychology students completing an in-basket activity. ANOVA procedures revealed a significant three-way interaction among these variables in the prediction of subjective task performance and task satisfaction. It was found that procedural information buffered the negative effects of task demands on ratings of performance and satisfaction only under conditions of lowbehavioral control. This pattern of results suggests that procedural information may have a compensatory effect when the work environment is characterized by a combination of high task demands and low behavioral control. Study 2 (N = 256) utilized simple and complex versions of the in-basket activity to examine the extent to which the interactive relationship among task demands, behavioral control, and procedural information varied as a functionof task complexity. There was further support for the stress-buffering role of procedural information on work task responses under conditions of low behavioral control. This effect was, however, only present when the in-basket activity was characterized by high task complexity, suggesting that the interactive relationship among these variables may depend on the type of tasks performed at work. Copyright (C) 1999 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

ASDD Area Sistemi Dipartimentali e Documentali, Università di Bologna, Catalogo delle riviste ed altri periodici
Documento generato il 09/07/20 alle ore 01:11:17