Catalogo Articoli (Spogli Riviste)

OPAC HELP

Titolo:
Cognition, language and behaviour in motor neurone disease: Evidence of frontotemporal dysfunction
Autore:
Bak, TH; Hodges, JR;
Indirizzi:
MRC, Cognit & Brain Sci Unit, Cambridge CB2 2EF, England MRC Cambridge England CB2 2EF Brain Sci Unit, Cambridge CB2 2EF, England Univ Cambridge, Addenbrookes Hosp, Neurol Unit, Cambridge CB2 2QQ, EnglandUniv Cambridge Cambridge England CB2 2QQ nit, Cambridge CB2 2QQ, England
Titolo Testata:
DEMENTIA AND GERIATRIC COGNITIVE DISORDERS
, volume: 10, anno: 1999, supplemento:, 1
pagine: 29 - 32
SICI:
1420-8008(1999)10:<29:CLABIM>2.0.ZU;2-S
Fonte:
ISI
Lingua:
ENG
Soggetto:
AMYOTROPHIC-LATERAL-SCLEROSIS; POSITRON EMISSION TOMOGRAPHY; DEMENTIA; APHASIA; ASSOCIATION;
Keywords:
motor neurone disease; frontotemporal dementia; progressive aphasia;
Tipo documento:
Article
Natura:
Periodico
Settore Disciplinare:
Clinical Medicine
Life Sciences
Citazioni:
37
Recensione:
Indirizzi per estratti:
Indirizzo: Bak, TH MRC, Cognit & Brain Sci Unit, 15 Chaucer Rd, Cambridge CB2 2EF, England MRC 15 Chaucer Rd Cambridge England CB2 2EF idge CB2 2EF, England
Citazione:
T.H. Bak e J.R. Hodges, "Cognition, language and behaviour in motor neurone disease: Evidence of frontotemporal dysfunction", DEMENT G C, 10, 1999, pp. 29-32

Abstract

Cognitive symptoms accompanying motor neurone disease (MND) have been recognized and described since the late 19th century. Numerous reports from Europe, North America and Japan suggest existence of a syndrome that can be described as MND/dementia. Typically, psychiatric and cognitive changes, strongly reminiscent of frontotemporal dementia, precede the occurrence of the classical signs and symptoms of MND by several months. In a small number ofpatients a similar picture can be heralded by a progressive aphasia leading ultimately to mutism. While the syndromes of MND/dementia and MND/aphasiaconstitute a comparatively small group, subtle but consistent cognitive alterations have also been observed in the majority of nondemented MND patients. Although generally much less pronounced, their pattern, affecting mostly frontal-executive functions, resembles that of MND/dementia. Post mortem examination results, describing pathological changes in the frontal robes, and functional neuroimaging studies, showing abnormal pattern of frontal activation, add more weight to the hypothesis linking MND to the frontotemporal dementia.

ASDD Area Sistemi Dipartimentali e Documentali, Università di Bologna, Catalogo delle riviste ed altri periodici
Documento generato il 28/11/20 alle ore 04:26:55