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Titolo:
Children's growth parameters vary by type of fruit juice consumed
Autore:
Dennison, BA; Rockwell, HL; Nichols, MJ; Jenkins, P;
Indirizzi:
Bassett Healthcare, Res Inst, Cooperstown, NY 13326 USA Bassett Healthcare Cooperstown NY USA 13326 st, Cooperstown, NY 13326 USA Columbia Univ Coll Phys & Surg, Dept Pediat, New York, NY 10032 USA Columbia Univ Coll Phys & Surg New York NY USA 10032 w York, NY 10032 USA
Titolo Testata:
JOURNAL OF THE AMERICAN COLLEGE OF NUTRITION
fascicolo: 4, volume: 18, anno: 1999,
pagine: 346 - 352
SICI:
0731-5724(199908)18:4<346:CGPVBT>2.0.ZU;2-D
Fonte:
ISI
Lingua:
ENG
Soggetto:
CARBOHYDRATE MALABSORPTION; YOUNG-CHILDREN; ABSORPTION; FRUCTOSE; CONSUMPTION;
Keywords:
child nutrition; obesity; body height; fruit juice; beverages; diet; nutrition policy; growth disorders;
Tipo documento:
Article
Natura:
Periodico
Settore Disciplinare:
Life Sciences
Citazioni:
14
Recensione:
Indirizzi per estratti:
Indirizzo: Dennison, BA Bassett Healthcare, Res Inst, 1 Atwell Rd, Cooperstown, NY 13326 USA Bassett Healthcare 1 Atwell Rd Cooperstown NY USA 13326 6 USA
Citazione:
B.A. Dennison et al., "Children's growth parameters vary by type of fruit juice consumed", J AM COL N, 18(4), 1999, pp. 346-352

Abstract

Background: Excessive fruit juice consumption in young children has been associated with nonorganic failure to thrive and short stature in some children and with obesity in others. Objective: To evaluate, in a sample of healthy young children, whether theassociations between fruit juice intakes and growth parameters differ by the type of fruit juice consumed. Design: Cross-sectional study. Setting: General primary care health center in upstate New York. Participants: One hundred sixteen two-year-old children and one hundred seven five-year-old children, who were scheduled for a nonacute visit, and their primary care-takers or parents were recruited over a two-year period. Methods: For 163 children (73% of total), 14 days of dietary records were available. The dietary records were entered and analyzed using the Nutrition Data System (NDS). Type of fruit juice was classified according to Nutrition Coordinating Center food codes. Height was measured using a Harpenden Stadiometer. Weight was measured using a standard balance beam scale. Results: The children consumed, on average, 5.5 fluid oz/day of fruit juices, which were classified by the NDS software as 35% apple juice, 31% orange juice, 25% grape juice and 9% other types and/or mixtures of fruit juice. Children with higher fruit juice intakes had lower total fat, saturated fat and cholesterol intakes. Child height was inversely related to apple juice intake (p=0.007) and grape juice intake (p=0.02), after adjustment for child age, gender and energy intake (excluding fruit juice) and maternal height. Apple juice intake was correlated with child body mass index (p<0.05) and ponderal index (p<0.005), after adjustment for the above covariates. Total cholesterol, LDL-cholesterol, triglyceride and lipoprotein(a) levels were not related to intakes of any of the fruit juices examined. The children's ratios of total cholesterol to HDL cholesterol were correlated with grapejuice intakes, while HDL-cholesterol levels were inversely related to grape juice intakes. There were no significant relationships between fruit juice intake and measures of anemia (hematocrit or mean corpuscular volume). Conclusions: The previously reported associations between short stature and high intakes of fruit juice were observed for intakes of both apple juiceand grape juice. The associations between high fruit juice intakes and obesity were observed with apple juice intakes only. Because most of the fruitjuice mixtures were classified as single fruit juices, the findings, especially those with grape juice, need to be cautiously interpreted. High intakes of fruit juice, however, appear to be associated with growth extremes inyoung children. Thus, it would seem prudent for parents and caretakers to moderate the fruit juice intakes of their young children.

ASDD Area Sistemi Dipartimentali e Documentali, Università di Bologna, Catalogo delle riviste ed altri periodici
Documento generato il 04/04/20 alle ore 02:33:35