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Titolo:
Diagnosing the search cost effect: Waiting time and the moderating impact of prior category knowledge
Autore:
Smith, GE; Venkatraman, MP; Dholakia, RR;
Indirizzi:
Boston Coll, Carroll Sch Management, Chestnut Hill, MA 02167 USA Boston Coll Chestnut Hill MA USA 02167 ement, Chestnut Hill, MA 02167 USA Suffolk Univ, Beacon Hill, MA 02108 USA Suffolk Univ Beacon Hill MA USA 02108 olk Univ, Beacon Hill, MA 02108 USA Univ Rhode Isl, Coll Business Adm, Kingston, RI 02881 USA Univ Rhode Isl Kingston RI USA 02881 Business Adm, Kingston, RI 02881 USA
Titolo Testata:
JOURNAL OF ECONOMIC PSYCHOLOGY
fascicolo: 3, volume: 20, anno: 1999,
pagine: 285 - 314
SICI:
0167-4870(199906)20:3<285:DTSCEW>2.0.ZU;2-5
Fonte:
ISI
Lingua:
ENG
Soggetto:
CONSUMER INFORMATION SEARCH; NONCOMPARABLE ALTERNATIVES; DECISION-MAKING; STRATEGIES;
Keywords:
prior category knowledge; search cost; waiting time; search;
Tipo documento:
Article
Natura:
Periodico
Settore Disciplinare:
Social & Behavioral Sciences
Citazioni:
38
Recensione:
Indirizzi per estratti:
Indirizzo: Smith, GE Boston Coll, Carroll Sch Management, Fulton Hall 442, Chestnut Hill, MA 02167 USA Boston Coll Fulton Hall 442 Chestnut Hill MA USA 02167 02167 USA
Citazione:
G.E. Smith et al., "Diagnosing the search cost effect: Waiting time and the moderating impact of prior category knowledge", J ECON PSYC, 20(3), 1999, pp. 285-314

Abstract

Studies have concluded that cost of search and prior knowledge are two major influences on search. What is not known is whether the effect of search cost is the same for consumers of differing knowledge levels, particularly when consumers must wait to retrieve information. This paper studies the impact on search of different types of search cost: cognitive search cost, operationalized using prior category knowledge; and external search cost, operationalized using waiting times to obtain information. We focus on the prior knowledge x waiting time interaction effect on search in a computer search environment. We find that knowledge facilitates search, but only in low waiting time conditions. High knowledge consumers augment their search withmore complex and cognitively demanding sources and patterns of informationacquisition. But the search of low knowledge consumers remains largely unaffected. Implications of the study's findings are discussed. (C) 1999 Elsevier Science B.V. All rights reserved. PsycINFO classification: 3900; 3920; 3940; 2320JEL classification: D12; D80; D83.

ASDD Area Sistemi Dipartimentali e Documentali, Università di Bologna, Catalogo delle riviste ed altri periodici
Documento generato il 27/11/20 alle ore 13:26:15