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Titolo:
FECUNDITY, LIFE-SPAN AND EGG MASS IN BUTTERFLIES - EFFECTS OF MALE-DERIVED NUTRIENTS AND FEMALE SIZE
Autore:
OBERHAUSER KS;
Indirizzi:
UNIV MINNESOTA,DEPT ECOL EVOLUT & BEHAV,100 ECOL BLDG ST PAUL MN 55108
Titolo Testata:
Functional ecology
fascicolo: 2, volume: 11, anno: 1997,
pagine: 166 - 175
SICI:
0269-8463(1997)11:2<166:FLAEMI>2.0.ZU;2-F
Fonte:
ISI
Lingua:
ENG
Soggetto:
REPRODUCTIVE OUTPUT; WEIGHT VARIATION; BODY-SIZE; PATERNAL INVESTMENT; SATYRID BUTTERFLIES; MONARCH BUTTERFLIES; OFFSPRING FITNESS; MULTIPLE MATINGS; HISTORY TRAITS; PIERIS-NAPI;
Keywords:
DANAUS PLEXIPPUS; LEPIDOPTERA; MONARCH BUTTERFLIES; PATERNAL INVESTMENT; SPERMATOPHORES;
Tipo documento:
Article
Natura:
Periodico
Settore Disciplinare:
Science Citation Index Expanded
Citazioni:
43
Recensione:
Indirizzi per estratti:
Citazione:
K.S. Oberhauser, "FECUNDITY, LIFE-SPAN AND EGG MASS IN BUTTERFLIES - EFFECTS OF MALE-DERIVED NUTRIENTS AND FEMALE SIZE", Functional ecology, 11(2), 1997, pp. 166-175

Abstract

1. Effects of larval reserves and nutrients received as adults on fecundity and lifespan in female Danaus plexippus (the Monarch Butterfly)were measured to determine the relative importance of different sources of nutrients for reproduction and somatic maintenance. 2. Egg-laying lifespan was correlated with female size but not with the amount of male-derived nutrients or adult food concentration. 3. Lifetime fecundity was higher when females received a large first spermatophore, but was not affected by female size when lifespan was controlled or by adult food concentration. 4. At the end of their lives, females containedunlaid eggs and retained, on average, 88% of their initial mass. Thisproportion was unchanged in two years, although mean egg-laying lifespan varied from 22.5 to 28.7 days. 5. Egg mass decreased over the female lifespan, and was correlated with female size. 6. These results suggest that larval reserves are more important for somatic maintenance than adult income, but that the protein-rich nutrients received from males contribute to egg production. This supports theoretical predictions and empirical studies of other Lepidoptera showing that larval reserves are less likely to affect fecundity when the adult income can contribute substantially to egg production.

ASDD Area Sistemi Dipartimentali e Documentali, Università di Bologna, Catalogo delle riviste ed altri periodici
Documento generato il 26/11/20 alle ore 14:29:02