Catalogo Articoli (Spogli Riviste)

OPAC HELP

Titolo:
Effects of perceived patient demand on prescribing anti-infective drugs
Autore:
Miller, E; MacKeigan, LD; Rosser, W; Marshman, J;
Indirizzi:
Univ Toronto, Fac Pharm, Toronto, ON M5S 2S2, Canada Univ Toronto TorontoON Canada M5S 2S2 Pharm, Toronto, ON M5S 2S2, Canada Univ Toronto, Dept Family & Community Med, Toronto, ON M5S 2S2, Canada Univ Toronto Toronto ON Canada M5S 2S2 y Med, Toronto, ON M5S 2S2, Canada
Titolo Testata:
CANADIAN MEDICAL ASSOCIATION JOURNAL
fascicolo: 2, volume: 161, anno: 1999,
pagine: 139 - 142
SICI:
0820-3946(19990727)161:2<139:EOPPDO>2.0.ZU;2-S
Fonte:
ISI
Lingua:
ENG
Soggetto:
CRITICAL INCIDENT; PATIENTS EXPECTATIONS; DOCTORS PERCEPTIONS; GENERAL-PRACTICE; QUESTIONNAIRE;
Tipo documento:
Article
Natura:
Periodico
Settore Disciplinare:
Clinical Medicine
Life Sciences
Citazioni:
22
Recensione:
Indirizzi per estratti:
Indirizzo: Miller, E Univ Toronto, Fac Pharm, 19 Russell St, Toronto, ON M5S 2S2, Canada Univ Toronto 19 Russell St Toronto ON Canada M5S 2S2 2S2, Canada
Citazione:
E. Miller et al., "Effects of perceived patient demand on prescribing anti-infective drugs", CAN MED A J, 161(2), 1999, pp. 139-142

Abstract

Background: Although patient demand is frequently cited by physicians as areason for inappropriate prescribing, the phenomenon has not been adequately studied. The objectives of this study were to determine the prevalence of perceived patient demand in physician-patient encounters; to identify characteristics of the patient, physician and prescribing situation that are associated with perceived demand; and to determine the influence of perceived demand on physicians' prescribing behaviour. Methods: An observational study using 2 survey approaches was conducted inFebruary and March 1996. Over a 2-day period 20 family physicians in the Toronto area completed a brief questionnaire for each patient encounter related to suspected infectious disease. Physicians were later asked in an interview to select and describe 1 or 2 incidents from these encounters during which perceived patient demand influenced their prescribing (critical incident technique). Results: Perceived patient demand was reported in 124 (48%) of the 260 physician-patient encounters; however, in almost 80% of these encounters physicians did not think that the demand had much influence on their decision toprescribe an anti-infective. When clinical need was uncertain, 28 (82%) of34 patients seeking an anti-infective were prescribed one, and physicians reported that they were influenced either "moderately" or "quite a bit" by perceived patient demand in over 50% of these cases. Of the 35 critical prescribing incidents identified during the interviews, anti-infectives were prescribed in 17 (49%); the reasons for prescribing in these situations werecategorized. Interpretation: This study provides preliminary data on the prevalence andinfluence of perceived patient demand in prescribing anti-infectives. Patient demand had more influence on prescribing when physicians were uncertainof the need for an anti-infective.

ASDD Area Sistemi Dipartimentali e Documentali, Università di Bologna, Catalogo delle riviste ed altri periodici
Documento generato il 15/07/20 alle ore 08:43:44