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Titolo:
Context-independent dynamic information for the perception of coarticulated vowels
Autore:
Jenkins, JJ; Strange, W; Trent, SA;
Indirizzi:
Univ S Florida, Dept Psychol, Tampa, FL 33620 USA Univ S Florida Tampa FLUSA 33620 rida, Dept Psychol, Tampa, FL 33620 USA
Titolo Testata:
JOURNAL OF THE ACOUSTICAL SOCIETY OF AMERICA
fascicolo: 1, volume: 106, anno: 1999,
pagine: 438 - 448
SICI:
0001-4966(199907)106:1<438:CDIFTP>2.0.ZU;2-5
Fonte:
ISI
Lingua:
ENG
Soggetto:
AMERICAN ENGLISH; 1ST FORMANT; SPECIFICATION; SYLLABLES; IDENTIFICATION; TRANSITIONS; FREQUENCY;
Tipo documento:
Article
Natura:
Periodico
Settore Disciplinare:
Life Sciences
Engineering, Computing & Technology
Citazioni:
34
Recensione:
Indirizzi per estratti:
Indirizzo: Jenkins, JJ Univ S Florida, Dept Psychol, 4200 Fowler Ave, Tampa, FL 33620USA Univ S Florida 4200 Fowler Ave Tampa FL USA 33620 FL 33620 USA
Citazione:
J.J. Jenkins et al., "Context-independent dynamic information for the perception of coarticulated vowels", J ACOUST SO, 106(1), 1999, pp. 438-448

Abstract

Most investigators agree that the acoustic information for American English vowels includes dynamic (time-varying) parameters as well as static "target" information contained in a single cross section of the syllable. Using the silent-center (SC) paradigm, the present experiment examined the case in which the initial and final portions of stop consonant-vowel-stop consonant (CVC) syllables containing the same vowel but different consonants were recombined into mixed-consonant SC syllables and presented to listeners forvowel identification. Ten vowels were spoken in six different syllables, /bVb, bVd, bVt, dVb, dVd, dVt/, embedded in a carrier sentence. Initial and final transitional portions of these syllables were cross-matched in: (1) silent-center syllables with original syllable durations (silences) preserved (mixed-consonant SC condition) and (2) mixed-consonant SC syllables with syllable duration equated across the ten vowels (fixed duration mixed-consonant SC condition). Vowel-identification accuracy in these two mixed consonant SC conditions was compared with performance on the original SC and fixed duration SC stimuli, and in initial and final control conditions in whichinitial and final transitional portions were each presented alone. Vowels were identified highly accurately in both mixed-consonant SC and original syllable SC conditions (only 7%-8% overall errors). Neutralizing duration information led to small, but significant, increases in identification errorsin both mixed-consonant and original fixed-duration SC conditions (14%-15%errors), but performance was still much more accurate than for initial andfinals control conditions (35% and 52% errors, respectively). Acoustical analysis confirmed that direction and extent of formant change from initial to final portions of mixed-consonant stimuli differed from that of originalsyllables, arguing against a target+offglide explanation of the perceptualresults. Results do support the hypothesis that temporal trajectories specifying "style of movement" provide information for the differentiation of American English tense and lax vowels, and that this information is invariant over the place of articulation and voicing of the surrounding stop consonants. (C) 1999 Acoustical Society of America. [S0001-4966(99)05107-3].

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Documento generato il 21/09/20 alle ore 03:32:08