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Titolo:
How much chemistry is there in chemical force microscopy?
Autore:
McKendry, R; Theoclitou, ME; Abell, C; Rayment, T;
Indirizzi:
Univ Cambridge, Dept Chem, Cambridge CB2 1EW, England Univ Cambridge Cambridge England CB2 1EW hem, Cambridge CB2 1EW, England
Titolo Testata:
JAPANESE JOURNAL OF APPLIED PHYSICS PART 1-REGULAR PAPERS SHORT NOTES & REVIEW PAPERS
fascicolo: 6B, volume: 38, anno: 1999,
pagine: 3901 - 3907
SICI:
0021-4922(199906)38:6B<3901:HMCITI>2.0.ZU;2-A
Fonte:
ISI
Lingua:
ENG
Soggetto:
SELF-ASSEMBLED MONOLAYERS; SURFACE INTERACTIONS; ADHESION FORCE; TIPS; FRICTION; DNA;
Keywords:
atomic force microscopy; chemical force microscopy; self assembled monolayers; chirality; adhesion; friction;
Tipo documento:
Article
Natura:
Periodico
Settore Disciplinare:
Physical, Chemical & Earth Sciences
--discip_EC--
Citazioni:
37
Recensione:
Indirizzi per estratti:
Indirizzo: Rayment, T Univ Cambridge, Dept Chem, Lensfield Rd, Cambridge CB2 1EW, England Univ Cambridge Lensfield Rd Cambridge England CB2 1EW England
Citazione:
R. McKendry et al., "How much chemistry is there in chemical force microscopy?", JPN J A P 1, 38(6B), 1999, pp. 3901-3907

Abstract

Chemical force microscopy (CFM) is a name given to the technique whereby chemical specificity is added to atomic force microscopy by deliberate derivatisation of an atomic force microscopy (AFM) probe. The most fundamental question that surrounds the technique is-how much 'chemistry' is added. Put another way, how valid is it to interpret image and adhesion contrast in terms of differences in surface chemistry? In this paper three aspects of this problem are described. In the first, the role of the substrate is discussed. Secondly, a series of experiments concerned with the interactions of pielectron systems is described. These show that it is not possible to interpret CFM solely in terms of electronic, or intermolecular interactions. Thethird section reviews CFM experiments with chiral surfaces. It is shown that chiral discrimination is not only possible but that the results are in accordance with parallel experiments using high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). Somewhat surprisingly, CFM experiments are more sensitive to chirality than HPLC.

ASDD Area Sistemi Dipartimentali e Documentali, Università di Bologna, Catalogo delle riviste ed altri periodici
Documento generato il 05/12/20 alle ore 01:17:23