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Titolo:
Effects on regional brain metabolism of high-altitude hypoxia: a study of six US marines
Autore:
Hochachka, PW; Clark, CM; Matheson, GO; Brown, WD; Stone, CK; Nickles, RJ; Holden, JE;
Indirizzi:
Univ British Columbia, Dept Zool, Vancouver, BC V6T 1Z4, Canada Univ British Columbia Vancouver BC Canada V6T 1Z4 ver, BC V6T 1Z4, Canada Univ British Columbia, Sports Med Div, Vancouver, BC V6T 1Z4, Canada Univ British Columbia Vancouver BC Canada V6T 1Z4 ver, BC V6T 1Z4, Canada Univ British Columbia, Dept Psychiat, Vancouver, BC V6T 1Z4, Canada Univ British Columbia Vancouver BC Canada V6T 1Z4 ver, BC V6T 1Z4, Canada Stanford Univ, Sch Med, Dept Funct Restorat, Stanford, CA 94305 USA Stanford Univ Stanford CA USA 94305 unct Restorat, Stanford, CA 94305 USA Univ Wisconsin, Dept Med Phys Radiol & Med, Madison, WI 53706 USA Univ Wisconsin Madison WI USA 53706 s Radiol & Med, Madison, WI 53706 USA
Titolo Testata:
AMERICAN JOURNAL OF PHYSIOLOGY-REGULATORY INTEGRATIVE AND COMPARATIVE PHYSIOLOGY
fascicolo: 1, volume: 46, anno: 1999,
pagine: R314 - R319
SICI:
0363-6119(199907)46:1<R314:EORBMO>2.0.ZU;2-Z
Fonte:
ISI
Lingua:
ENG
Soggetto:
CEREBRAL GLUCOSE-UTILIZATION; HYPOBARIC HYPOXIA; HIMALAYAN SHERPAS; ANDEAN NATIVES; PLASMA-GLUCOSE; DEFENSE; PERFORMANCE; ADAPTATION; TOLERANCE; CAPACITY;
Keywords:
brain positron emission tomography; hypobaric hypoxia; hypoxia acclimation; brain glucose metabolism;
Tipo documento:
Article
Natura:
Periodico
Settore Disciplinare:
Life Sciences
Citazioni:
36
Recensione:
Indirizzi per estratti:
Indirizzo: Hochachka, PW Univ British Columbia, Dept Zool, 6270 Univ Blvd, Vancouver,BC V6T 1Z4, Canada Univ British Columbia 6270 Univ Blvd Vancouver BC Canada V6T 1Z4
Citazione:
P.W. Hochachka et al., "Effects on regional brain metabolism of high-altitude hypoxia: a study of six US marines", AM J P-REG, 46(1), 1999, pp. R314-R319

Abstract

Previous studies of brain glucose metabolism in people indigenous to high-altitude environments uncovered two response patterns: Quechuas native to the high Andes of South America sustained modest hypometabolism in most brain regions interrogated, whereas Sherpas, native to the Himalayas and considered by many biologists to be most effectively high-altitude adapted of allhumans, showed brain metabolic patterns similar to lowlanders, with no acclimation effects noted. In the present study, the database was expanded to include hypoxia acclimation effects in lowlanders. Positron emission tomography (PET) and [F-18]-2-deoxy-2-fluro-D-glucose (FDG) imaging techniques were used to assess regional cerebral glucose metabolic rates (rCMR(glc)) in six US marines (Caucasian lineage) before and after a 63-day training program for operations at high altitudes ranging from 10,500 to 20,320 ft. Significant changes in rCMR(glc) were found for 7 of 25 brain regions examined. Significant decreases in absolute cerebral glucose metabolism after high-altitude exposure were found in five regions: three frontal, the left occipital lobe, and the right thalamus. In contrast, for the right and left cerebellum significant increases in metabolism were found. The magnitudes of these differences, in terms of absolute metabolism, were large, ranging from 10to 18%. Although the results may not be solely the result of lower oxygen levels at high altitude, these findings suggest that the brain of healthy human lowlanders responds to chronic hypoxia exposure with precise, region-specific fine tuning of rCMR(glc). The observed short-term hypoxia acclimation responses in these lowlanders clearly differ from the long-term hypoxia adaptations found in brain metabolism of people indigenous to high-altitudeenvironments.

ASDD Area Sistemi Dipartimentali e Documentali, Università di Bologna, Catalogo delle riviste ed altri periodici
Documento generato il 22/01/20 alle ore 06:45:45