Catalogo Articoli (Spogli Riviste)

OPAC HELP

Titolo:
Ethnic differences in thermal pain responses
Autore:
Edwards, RR; Fillingim, RB;
Indirizzi:
Univ Alabama, Dept Psychol, Birmingham, AL 35294 USA Univ Alabama Birmingham AL USA 35294 pt Psychol, Birmingham, AL 35294 USA
Titolo Testata:
PSYCHOSOMATIC MEDICINE
fascicolo: 3, volume: 61, anno: 1999,
pagine: 346 - 354
SICI:
0033-3174(199905/06)61:3<346:EDITPR>2.0.ZU;2-N
Fonte:
ISI
Lingua:
ENG
Soggetto:
SEX-ROLE INVENTORY; COLD-PRESSOR TEST; POSTOPERATIVE PAIN; BACK-PAIN; RACE; PERCEPTION; MODEL; FORMS; OLD; AGE;
Keywords:
ethnicity; race; thermal pain; pain sensitivity;
Tipo documento:
Article
Natura:
Periodico
Settore Disciplinare:
Social & Behavioral Sciences
Clinical Medicine
Life Sciences
Citazioni:
52
Recensione:
Indirizzi per estratti:
Indirizzo: Fillingim, RB Univ Alabama, Dept Psychol, 1300 Univ Blvd, Birmingham, AL 35294 USA Univ Alabama 1300 Univ Blvd Birmingham AL USA 35294 5294 USA
Citazione:
R.R. Edwards e R.B. Fillingim, "Ethnic differences in thermal pain responses", PSYCHOS MED, 61(3), 1999, pp. 346-354

Abstract

Objective: Although numerous studies have reported ethnic differences in the prevalence and severity of clinical pain, little is known about how these differences affect the perception of experimental pain. The present experiment examined the effects of ethnicity (African American vs, white) on thermal pain responses in a healthy undergraduate population. Methods: Thirty white subjects (16 women and 14 men) and 18 African Americans (10 women and8 men) participated in the study. Thermal testing included evaluation of the following: warmth thresholds, thermal pain thresholds, thermal pain tolerances, and magnitude estimates of both the intensity and unpleasantness ofthermal pain (at 46 degrees, 47 degrees, 48 degrees, and 49 degrees C). Results: Although no group differences emerged for warmth thresholds, thermalpain thresholds, or pain intensity ratings, African Americans demonstratedlower thermal pain tolerances than whites. In addition, African Americans had smaller slopes and larger intercepts than whites for ratings of pain unpleasantness. Additional analyses suggested that these findings were a consequence of group differences in thermal pain unpleasantness ratings at the lowest temperatures assessed (46 degrees and 47 degrees C); at these temperatures, African Americans rated the stimuli as more unpleasant than whites. Finally, group differences in thermal pain tolerance and thermal pain unpleasantness ratings seemed to partially account for greater self-reported daily pain symptoms among African Americans. Conclusions: Collectively, thesefindings seem to suggest ethnic differences in the perception of the affective-motivational dimension of thermal pain.

ASDD Area Sistemi Dipartimentali e Documentali, Università di Bologna, Catalogo delle riviste ed altri periodici
Documento generato il 09/04/20 alle ore 11:44:18