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Titolo:
ANALYSIS OF NEURAL INTERACTIONS EXPLAINS THE ACTIVATION OF OCCIPITAL CORTEX BY AN AUDITORY STIMULUS
Autore:
MCINTOSH AR; CABEZA RE; LOBAUGH NJ;
Indirizzi:
UNIV TORONTO,ROTMAN RES INST,BAYCREST CTR,3560 BATHURST ST TORONTO ONM6A 2E1 CANADA UNIV ALBERTA,DEPT PSYCHOL EDMONTON AB T6G 2E1 CANADA
Titolo Testata:
Journal of neurophysiology
fascicolo: 5, volume: 80, anno: 1998,
pagine: 2790 - 2796
SICI:
0022-3077(1998)80:5<2790:AONIET>2.0.ZU;2-O
Fonte:
ISI
Lingua:
ENG
Soggetto:
POSITRON EMISSION TOMOGRAPHY; EPISODIC MEMORY RETRIEVAL; CEREBRAL BLOOD-FLOW; PREFRONTAL CORTEX; FUNCTIONAL CONNECTIVITY; NETWORK ANALYSIS; VISUAL AREAS; HUMAN BRAIN; PROJECTIONS; ATTENTION;
Tipo documento:
Article
Natura:
Periodico
Settore Disciplinare:
Science Citation Index Expanded
Science Citation Index Expanded
Citazioni:
40
Recensione:
Indirizzi per estratti:
Citazione:
A.R. Mcintosh et al., "ANALYSIS OF NEURAL INTERACTIONS EXPLAINS THE ACTIVATION OF OCCIPITAL CORTEX BY AN AUDITORY STIMULUS", Journal of neurophysiology, 80(5), 1998, pp. 2790-2796

Abstract

Large-scale neural interactions were characterized in human subjects as they learned that an auditory stimulus signaled a visual event. Once learned, activation of left dorsal occipital cortex (increased regional cerebral blood flow) was observed when the auditory stimulus was presented alone. Partial least-squares analysis of the interregional correlations (functional connectivity) between the occipital area and the rest of the brain identified a pattern of covariation with four dominant brain areas that could have mediated this activation: prefrontal cortex (near Brodmann area 10, A10), premotor cortex (A6), superior temporal cortex (A41/42), and contralateral occipital cortex (A18). Interactions among these regions and the occipital area were quantified with structural equation modeling to identify the strongest sources of the effect on left occipital activity (effective connectivity). Learning-related changes in feedback effects from A10 and A41/42 appeared to account for this change in occipital activity. Influences from these areas on the occipital area were initially suppressive, or negative, becoming facilitory, or positive, as the association between the auditory and visual stimuli was acquired. Evaluating the total effects withinthe functional models showed positive influences throughout the network, suggesting enhanced interactions may have primed the system for the now-expected visual discrimination. By characterizing both changes in activity and the interactions underlying sensory associative learning, we demonstrated how parts of the nervous system operate as a cohesive network in learning about and responding to the environment.

ASDD Area Sistemi Dipartimentali e Documentali, Università di Bologna, Catalogo delle riviste ed altri periodici
Documento generato il 30/03/20 alle ore 12:09:51