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Titolo:
HOW THE OWL RESOLVES AUDITORY CODING AMBIGUITY
Autore:
MAZER JA;
Indirizzi:
UNIV CALIF BERKELEY,3210 TOLMAN HALL 1650 BERKELEY CA 94720 CALTECH,DEPT BIOL PASADENA CA 91125
Titolo Testata:
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United Statesof America
fascicolo: 18, volume: 95, anno: 1998,
pagine: 10932 - 10937
SICI:
0027-8424(1998)95:18<10932:HTORAC>2.0.ZU;2-U
Fonte:
ISI
Lingua:
ENG
Soggetto:
INTERAURAL TIME DIFFERENCE; CATS INFERIOR COLLICULUS; MEDIAL SUPERIOR OLIVE; LOW-FREQUENCY CELLS; BARN OWL; SOUND LOCALIZATION; NOISE STIMULI; BRAIN-STEM; NUCLEUS; REPRESENTATION;
Tipo documento:
Article
Natura:
Periodico
Settore Disciplinare:
Science Citation Index Expanded
Citazioni:
32
Recensione:
Indirizzi per estratti:
Citazione:
J.A. Mazer, "HOW THE OWL RESOLVES AUDITORY CODING AMBIGUITY", Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United Statesof America, 95(18), 1998, pp. 10932-10937

Abstract

The barn owl (Tyto alba) uses interaural time difference (ITD) cues to localize sounds in the horizontal plane. Low-order binaural auditoryneurons with sharp frequency tuning act as narrow-band coincidence detectors; such neurons respond equally well to sounds with a particularITD and its phase equivalents and are said to be phase ambiguous. Higher-order neurons with broad frequency tuning are unambiguously selective for single ITDs in response to broadband sounds and show little orno response to phase equivalents. Selectivity for single ITDs is thought to arise from the convergence of parallel, narrow-band frequency channels that originate in the cochlea. ITD tuning to variable bandwidth stimuli was measured in higher-order neurons of the owl's inferior colliculus to examine the rules that govern the relationship between frequency channel convergence and the resolution of phase ambiguity. Ambiguity decreased as stimulus bandwidth increased, reaching a minimum at 2-3 kHz. Two independent mechanisms appear to contribute to the elimination of ambiguity: one suppressive and one facilitative. The integration of information carried by parallel, distributed processing channels is a common theme of sensory processing that spans both modality and species boundaries. The principles underlying the resolution of phase ambiguity and frequency channel convergence in the owl may have implications for other sensory systems, such as electrolocation in electric fish and the computation of binocular disparity in the avian and mammalian visual systems.

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Documento generato il 01/12/20 alle ore 13:16:49