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Titolo:
BURN AREA COLOR CHANGES AFTER SUPERFICIAL BURNS IN CHILDHOOD - CAN THEY BE PREDICTED
Autore:
DECHALAIN TMB; TANG C; THOMSON HG;
Indirizzi:
HOSP SICK CHILDREN,DIV PLAST SURG,555 UNIV AVE TORONTO ON M5G 1H4 CANADA
Titolo Testata:
The Journal of burn care & rehabilitation
fascicolo: 1, volume: 19, anno: 1998,
parte:, 1
pagine: 39 - 49
SICI:
0273-8481(1998)19:1<39:BACCAS>2.0.ZU;2-N
Fonte:
ISI
Lingua:
ENG
Soggetto:
SKIN COLOR; DERMABRASION; PIGMENTATION; VITILIGO;
Tipo documento:
Article
Natura:
Periodico
Settore Disciplinare:
Science Citation Index Expanded
Science Citation Index Expanded
Science Citation Index Expanded
Citazioni:
27
Recensione:
Indirizzi per estratti:
Citazione:
T.M.B. Dechalain et al., "BURN AREA COLOR CHANGES AFTER SUPERFICIAL BURNS IN CHILDHOOD - CAN THEY BE PREDICTED", The Journal of burn care & rehabilitation, 19(1), 1998, pp. 39-49

Abstract

Pigmentation changes after superficial burn injuries are often difficult to predict. We analyzed a sample of patients with burn injuries, looking for clinical indicators of predictable color changes in burn wounds. A sample of 50 children, predominantly those with pigmented skins, who had sustained superficial partial-thickness, (second degree) thermal, scald, or friction burns, were retrospectively grouped. Chemical and electric burns, and those needing skin grafts were excluded. Forty-one patients returned for interview and examination, an average of 63 months after injury (range, 3 to 276 months). All patients had their skin color graded in terms of the Fitzpatrick scale-a numeric scale that combines innate skin color plus reported history of skin responseto sun exposure, to assign a value from 1 to 6, where white skin thatreddens but does not tan on sun exposure is 1 and heavily pigmented black skin is 6. The burn site, as well as unburned areas of control skin, were tested for reflectance and luminance with use of a well-validated spectrophotometric technique. As an addendum, clinical photographs of a further 50 patients were similarly analyzed. During the first 3years after injury, burn site color changes were variable. Subsequently, there was cumulative hyperpigmentation at the burn site, provided that the melanocyte-bearing deep dermis had not been destroyed. Hyperpigmentation correlated significantly with skin color, as quantified bythe Fitzpatrick scale (p < 0.01), and with time after injury (p < 0.05).

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Documento generato il 30/03/20 alle ore 13:30:41