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Titolo:
EVALUATING TESTING METHODS BY DELIVERED RELIABILITY
Autore:
FRANKL PG; HAMLET RG; LITTLEWOOD B; STRIGINI L;
Indirizzi:
POLYTECH UNIV,CIS DEPT,6 METROTECH CTR BROOKLYN NY 11201 OREGON HLTH SCI UNIV,DEPT COMP SCI PORTLAND OR 97201 CITY UNIV LONDON,CTR SOFTWARE RELIABIL LONDON EC1V 0HB ENGLAND
Titolo Testata:
IEEE transactions on software engineering
fascicolo: 8, volume: 24, anno: 1998,
pagine: 586 - 601
SICI:
0098-5589(1998)24:8<586:ETMBDR>2.0.ZU;2-M
Fonte:
ISI
Lingua:
ENG
Soggetto:
SOFTWARE; PARTITION;
Keywords:
RELIABILITY; DEBUGGING; SOFTWARE TESTING; STATISTICAL TESTING THEORY;
Tipo documento:
Article
Natura:
Periodico
Settore Disciplinare:
CompuMath Citation Index
Science Citation Index Expanded
Science Citation Index Expanded
Citazioni:
26
Recensione:
Indirizzi per estratti:
Citazione:
P.G. Frankl et al., "EVALUATING TESTING METHODS BY DELIVERED RELIABILITY", IEEE transactions on software engineering, 24(8), 1998, pp. 586-601

Abstract

There are two main goals in testing software: 1) to achieve adequate quality (debug testing); the objective is to probe the software for defects so that these can be removed and 2) to assess existing quality (operational testing); the objective is to gain confidence that the software is reliable. The names are arbitrary, and most testing techniques address both goals to some degree. However, debug methods tend to ignore random selection of test data from an operational profile, while for operational methods this selection is all-important. Debug methodsare thought, without any real proof, to be good at uncovering defectsso that these can be repaired, but having done so they do not providea technically defensible assessment of the reliability that results. On the other hand, operational methods provide accurate assessment, but may not be as useful for achieving reliability. This paper examines the relationship between the two testing goals, using a probabilistic analysis. We define simple models of programs and their testing, and try to answer theoretically the question of how to attain program reliability: Is it better to test by probing for defects as in debug testing, or to assess reliability directly as in operational testing, uncovering defects by accident, so to speak? There is no simple answer, of course. Testing methods are compared in a model where program failures are detected and the software changed to eliminate them. The ''better'' method delivers higher reliability after all test failures have beeneliminated. This comparison extends previous work, where the measure was the probability of detecting a failure. Revealing special cases are exhibited in which each kind of testing is superior. Preliminary analysis of the distribution of the delivered reliability indicates that even simple models have unusual statistical properties, suggesting caution in interpreting theoretical comparisons.

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Documento generato il 18/09/20 alle ore 10:58:13