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Titolo:
GLUCOSE AND MEMORY - FRACTIONATION OF ENHANCEMENT EFFECTS
Autore:
FOSTER JK; LIDDER PG; SUNRAM SI;
Indirizzi:
UNIV MANCHESTER,DEPT PSYCHOL,OXFORD RD MANCHESTER M13 9PL LANCS ENGLAND
Titolo Testata:
Psychopharmacology
fascicolo: 3, volume: 137, anno: 1998,
pagine: 259 - 270
Fonte:
ISI
Lingua:
ENG
Soggetto:
BLOOD-GLUCOSE; COGNITIVE FUNCTIONS; GLYCEMIC CONTROL; SENILE DEMENTIA; ELDERLY HUMANS; YOUNG-ADULTS; PERFORMANCE; ATTENTION; IMPROVES; RATS;
Keywords:
GLUCOSE; SACCHARIN; LONG-TERM MEMORY; SHORT-TERM MEMORY; VERBAL MEMORY; NONVERBAL MEMORY; YOUNG CONTROL PARTICIPANTS;
Tipo documento:
Article
Natura:
Periodico
Settore Disciplinare:
Science Citation Index Expanded
Science Citation Index Expanded
Science Citation Index Expanded
Citazioni:
40
Recensione:
Indirizzi per estratti:
Citazione:
J.K. Foster et al., "GLUCOSE AND MEMORY - FRACTIONATION OF ENHANCEMENT EFFECTS", Psychopharmacology, 137(3), 1998, pp. 259-270

Abstract

Recent research findings indicate that glucose administration enhances some aspects of cognitive functioning. To date, those studies which have investigated the effects of glucose on memory in human participants have concentrated on its apparent ability to attenuate memory impairment. Relatively little research has been done in humans investigating the effects of glucose on memory performance in young healthy participants in whom no memory deficits exist. Moreover, the work which has been conducted in this population has produced somewhat equivocal findings. In this study, after overnight fasting the influence of a 25 g oral dosage of glucose on a range of measures of memory performance wasinvestigated in healthy young female participants. Two control treatments (saccharin and water) were also administered. There was a significant glucose facilitation effect upon performance of long-term verbal free and cued recall tasks which did not vary with test delay. Performance on these free and cued verbal recall measures correlated significantly with blood glucose levels across all participants. No glucose-related facilitation was observed on either a test of short-term verbal memory (forwards/backwards digit recall) or a test of long-term non-verbal memory (complex figure reproduction). However, the significant glucose-related effects observed with long-term free and cued recall remained after controlling for participants' differential baseline blood glucose levels and individual levels of immediate memory performance. Therefore, memory improvement after glucose ingestion was not merely aconsequence of lower baseline blood glucose or lower immediate memoryperformance in the glucose treatment group. These findings indicate that there may be some fractionation in the memory facilitation effectsof glucose: the memory enhancing effect of glucose administration in healthy young adults may be greatest on tests of long-term verbal recall. The results suggest that glucose may enhance retention in and/or retrieval from long-term verbal memory.

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Documento generato il 22/01/20 alle ore 07:19:18