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Titolo:
ELONGATION PATTERNS OF THE COLLATERAL LIGAMENTS OF THE HUMAN KNEE
Autore:
HARFE DT; CHUINARD CR; ESPINOZA LM; THOMAS KA; SOLOMONOW M;
Indirizzi:
TULANE UNIV,MED CTR,DEPT ORTHOPAED SURG,BIOENGN LAB,2025 GRAVIER ST,SUITE 400 NEW ORLEANS LA 70112 TULANE UNIV,MED CTR,DEPT ORTHOPAED SURG,BIOENGN LAB NEW ORLEANS LA 70112
Titolo Testata:
Clinical biomechanics
fascicolo: 3, volume: 13, anno: 1998,
pagine: 163 - 175
SICI:
0268-0033(1998)13:3<163:EPOTCL>2.0.ZU;2-K
Fonte:
ISI
Lingua:
ENG
Soggetto:
ANTERIOR CRUCIATE LIGAMENT; ROTATION; INVITRO; JOINT; DISPLACEMENT; RESTRAINTS; STABILITY; POSTERIOR; LAXITY;
Keywords:
MEDIAL COLLATERAL LIGAMENT; LATERAL COLLATERAL LIGAMENT; STRAIN; KNEE;
Tipo documento:
Article
Natura:
Periodico
Settore Disciplinare:
Science Citation Index Expanded
Science Citation Index Expanded
Citazioni:
34
Recensione:
Indirizzi per estratti:
Citazione:
D.T. Harfe et al., "ELONGATION PATTERNS OF THE COLLATERAL LIGAMENTS OF THE HUMAN KNEE", Clinical biomechanics, 13(3), 1998, pp. 163-175

Abstract

Objective. To determine the responses of the medial and lateral collateral ligaments (MCL, LCL) of the human knee to externally applied stresses. Design. Differential variable reluctance transducers were used to measure length changes along the long posterior parallel fibers of the MCL and the middle third of the LCL through a flexion range of 15-120 degrees and a variety of external stresses. Background. There is alack of consensus regarding the collateral ligament response to internal and external tibial rotation. In addition, there are very few studies that have investigated the effects of quadriceps and hamstrings muscle group loads on the strain in the collateral ligaments. Methods. Three series of tests were performed. First, the passive behavior of the ligaments was obtained as well as the ligament response to 3 degreesof varus and valgus rotation. The next series tested the ligaments' response to 0-10 degrees of internal and external tibial axial rotation. Finally, isolated and co-contracted quadriceps and hamstrings musclegroup loads were applied. Results. The instrumented portions of both ligaments were more strained in extension than flexion. Varus rotations stretched the LCL, whereas valgus rotations elongated the MCL. The strain in the MCL was shown to increase during external rotation and decrease during internal rotation. The LCL did not exhibit a uniform response across specimens to internal or external tibial axial rotation, but was consistent between left and right knees from a single cadaver. Highly consistent trends of interactions between muscle loads and thestrain in both the MCL and LCL were noted. Conclusions. The responsesof the MCL and LCL to applied stresses are dependent upon the flexionangle of the knee, the influence of muscle loading and, to a lesser extent, anatomic variation in the ligaments themselves. Guidelines for rehabilitation of the collateral ligaments following injury are suggested. Relevance The results of this study have the following clinical implications. After injury to the MCL, the following should be avoided:valgus stresses, external rotation, non-weight-bearing isometric quadriceps muscle group contractions at knee flexion greater than 45 degrees, and non-weight-bearing isometric hamstrings muscle group contraction at all angles of knee flexion. If surgical repair of the MCL is performed, the repair should be assessed for external rotation stability. Similarly, after injury to the LCL, both internal and external rotatory stresses should be avoided, and varus rotation should be avoided atall angles of knee flexion. Non-weight-bearing isometric quadriceps muscle group activity does not increase strain in the LCL, and this activity can be performed during LCL rehabilitation. (C) 1998 Elsevier Science Ltd. All rights reserved.

ASDD Area Sistemi Dipartimentali e Documentali, Università di Bologna, Catalogo delle riviste ed altri periodici
Documento generato il 04/07/20 alle ore 18:33:01