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Titolo:
INCREASING INTENSITY OF PASTURE USE WITH DAIRY-CATTLE - AN ECONOMIC-ANALYSIS
Autore:
HANSON GD; CUNNINGHAM LC; FORD SA; MULLER LD; PARSONS RL;
Indirizzi:
PENN STATE UNIV,DEPT AGR ECON & RURAL SOCIOL UNIVERSITY PK PA 16802
Titolo Testata:
Journal of production agriculture
fascicolo: 2, volume: 11, anno: 1998,
pagine: 175 - 179
SICI:
0890-8524(1998)11:2<175:IIOPUW>2.0.ZU;2-9
Fonte:
ISI
Lingua:
ENG
Tipo documento:
Article
Natura:
Periodico
Settore Disciplinare:
Science Citation Index Expanded
Citazioni:
24
Recensione:
Indirizzi per estratti:
Citazione:
G.D. Hanson et al., "INCREASING INTENSITY OF PASTURE USE WITH DAIRY-CATTLE - AN ECONOMIC-ANALYSIS", Journal of production agriculture, 11(2), 1998, pp. 175-179

Abstract

Intensive grazing is a fast growing dairy production system in the USA, New Zealand, and Ireland. The key concept underlying intensive grazing systems is the substitution of cow-harvest for machinery harvest of forages. Study objectives were: (i) to determine whether randomly selected, representative dairy farms using intensive grazing were profitable, (ii) to determine whether grazing was more or less profitable than other crop enterprises, and (iii) to identify factors statisticallyassociated with increasing intensity of grazing. Data were collected on 53 farms in a prominent dairy region of Pennsylvania in 1993. Results indicated that moderate intensive grazing achieved a $129/acre return to operator management and labor, compared with $20 and $58 returnsfor all hay and corn silage enterprises, respectively, Dairy enterprise returns averaged about $317/cow. Debt per cow was substantially higher for farmers increasing grazing intensity. Pasture acres per cow, high debt-to assets, and negative cash flows were statistically associated with increasing intensity of pasture use. Thus, this study suggests that farm financial constraints of high debt and poor cash flows provide an important motivation to increase grazing intensity. A major drawback of intensive grazing is the likelihood of achieving slightly lower milk production than with confinement feeding. The primary economic benefit of intensive grazing was the reduction of costs associated with the production of pasture forage vs, production of other crops.

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Documento generato il 25/11/20 alle ore 00:17:57