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Titolo:
School disorder: The influence of individual, institutional, and communityfactors
Autore:
Welsh, WN; Greene, JR; Jenkins, PH;
Indirizzi:
Temple Univ, Philadelphia, PA 19122 USA Temple Univ Philadelphia PA USA 19122 le Univ, Philadelphia, PA 19122 USA
Titolo Testata:
CRIMINOLOGY
fascicolo: 1, volume: 37, anno: 1999,
pagine: 73 - 115
SICI:
0011-1384(199902)37:1<73:SDTIOI>2.0.ZU;2-X
Fonte:
ISI
Lingua:
ENG
Soggetto:
DELINQUENT-BEHAVIOR; PERCEIVED RISK; SOCIAL-CONTROL; CRIME; FEAR; INTERVENTIONS; NEIGHBORHOODS; MULTILEVEL; CLIMATE; REDUCE;
Tipo documento:
Article
Natura:
Periodico
Settore Disciplinare:
Social & Behavioral Sciences
Citazioni:
90
Recensione:
Indirizzi per estratti:
Indirizzo: Welsh, WN Temple Univ, Philadelphia, PA 19122 USA Temple Univ Philadelphia PA USA 19122 hiladelphia, PA 19122 USA
Citazione:
W.N. Welsh et al., "School disorder: The influence of individual, institutional, and communityfactors", CRIMINOLOGY, 37(1), 1999, pp. 73-115

Abstract

Drawing upon control theory, school climate theory, and social disorganization theory, this study examined the relative influence of individual, institutional, and community factors on misconduct in Philadelphia middle schools. Using U.S. census data, school district data, police department data, and school climate survey data obtained from the administration of the Effective School Battery to 7,583 students in II middle schools, we examined thefollowing predictors of student misconduct: community poverty and residential stability; community crime; school size; student perceptions of school climate (school attachment); and individual student characteristics (e.g, age, race, sex, school involvement and effort, belief in rules, positive peer associations). "Community" was conceptualized in two ways: "local" (the census tract around the school), and "imported" (aggregated measures from the census tracts where students actually lived). We used hierarchical linearmodeling techniques (HLM) to examine between- and within-school factors. Individual-level factors accounted for 16% of the explained variance; schooland community-level factors (both local and imported) added only small increments (an additional 4.1-4.5%). We conclude that simplistic assumptions that "bad" communities typically produce "bad" children or "bad" schools areunwarranted.

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Documento generato il 29/03/20 alle ore 17:23:30