Catalogo Articoli (Spogli Riviste)

OPAC HELP

Titolo:
LEARNING TO READ AT HOME AND AT SCHOOL
Autore:
STUART M; DIXON M; MASTERSON J; QUINLAN P;
Indirizzi:
UNIV LONDON,INST EDUC,25 WOBURN SQ LONDON WC1H 0AA ENGLAND UNIV ESSEX COLCHESTER CO4 3SQ ESSEX ENGLAND YORK UNIV N YORK ON M3J 1P3 CANADA
Titolo Testata:
British journal of educational psychology
, volume: 68, anno: 1998,
parte:, 1
pagine: 3 - 14
SICI:
0007-0998(1998)68:<3:LTRAHA>2.0.ZU;2-2
Fonte:
ISI
Lingua:
ENG
Soggetto:
TEACH PHONEMIC AWARENESS; PARENTAL INVOLVEMENT; YOUNG-CHILDREN; FOLLOW-UP; PHONOLOGICAL AWARENESS; PROGRAM; ABILITIES;
Tipo documento:
Article
Natura:
Periodico
Settore Disciplinare:
Physical, Chemical & Earth Sciences
Citazioni:
34
Recensione:
Indirizzi per estratti:
Citazione:
M. Stuart et al., "LEARNING TO READ AT HOME AND AT SCHOOL", British journal of educational psychology, 68, 1998, pp. 3-14

Abstract

Aims. Social class differences in reading achievement are well documented in the literature. The present study looked for social class differences in home literacy activities, such as reading to children, hearing children read, teaching children about the alphabet, and fosteringphonological awareness through nursery rhymes and games of 'I Spy', which might underlie these. Sample. Sixty-one parents of children in Reception and Years 1 and 2 in a North London primary school were interviewed. Two social class groups were identified, by mother's occupation. Methods. A structured questionnaire was used in the parental interviews: thus data collected relied on self-reports. Children's reading ages and alphabet knowledge were measured, with the latter used as an indicator of reliability of parental self-report. Results. Mean reading age was significantly higher in middle class children, who knew significantly more letter-sound correspondences. No social class difference was found in parents' reports of time spent hearing children read, butmiddle class parents reported spending more time reading to children:however, this did not relate to reading age. No social class difference was found in estimates of children's nursery rhyme knowledge, but middle class parents were more likely to report frequently playing 'I Spy'. Both social class groups were equally likely to report teaching children letter names and sounds, but middle class parents reported using a wider variety and more materials than working class parents. Whenletter-sound knowledge was used as a predictor of reading achievement, social class was no longer a significant determiner. Conclusions, Very few differences were found by social class, and those found did notrelate clearly to reading achievement.

ASDD Area Sistemi Dipartimentali e Documentali, Università di Bologna, Catalogo delle riviste ed altri periodici
Documento generato il 19/09/20 alle ore 14:26:11