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Titolo:
GLUCOSE, MEMORY, AND AGING
Autore:
KOROL DL; GOLD PE;
Indirizzi:
UNIV VIRGINIA,DEPT PSYCHOL,LIFE SCI LABS,102 GILMER HALL CHARLOTTESVILLE VA 22903
Titolo Testata:
The American journal of clinical nutrition
fascicolo: 4, volume: 67, anno: 1998,
pagine: 764 - 771
SICI:
0002-9165(1998)67:4<764:>2.0.ZU;2-0
Fonte:
ISI
Lingua:
ENG
Soggetto:
BLOOD-GLUCOSE; ALZHEIMERS-DISEASE; ELDERLY HUMANS; SENILE DEMENTIA; ENHANCEMENT; EPINEPHRINE; AGE; INJECTIONS; DEFICITS; RATS;
Keywords:
GLUCOSE; COGNITION; AGING; TASK DIFFICULTY; RATS; HUMANS; MEMORY; BRAIN; ACETYLCHOLINE;
Tipo documento:
Article
Natura:
Periodico
Settore Disciplinare:
Science Citation Index Expanded
Citazioni:
46
Recensione:
Indirizzi per estratti:
Citazione:
D.L. Korol e P.E. Gold, "GLUCOSE, MEMORY, AND AGING", The American journal of clinical nutrition, 67(4), 1998, pp. 764-771

Abstract

Circulating glucose concentrations regulate many brain functions, including learning and memory. Much of the evidence for this view comes from experiments assessing stress-related release of epinephrine with subsequent increases in blood glucose concentrations. One application of this work has been to investigate whether age-related memory impairments result from dysfunctions in the neuroendocrine regulation of the brain processes responsible for memory. Like humans, aged rodents exhibit some memory impairments that can be reversed by administration of epinephrine or glucose. In elderly humans, ingestion of glucose enhances some cognitive functions, with effects best documented thus far on tests of verbal contextual and noncontextual information. Glucose alsoeffectively enhances cognition in persons with Alzheimer disease or Down syndrome. Although earlier evidence suggested that glucose does not enhance cognitive function in healthy young adults, more recent findings suggest that glucose is effective in this population, provided the tests are sufficiently difficult. In college students, glucose consumption significantly enhanced memory of material in a paragraph. Glucose also appeared to enhance attentional processes in these students. Neither face and word recognition nor working memory was influenced by treatment with glucose. The neurobiological mechanisms by which glucose acts are under current investigation. Initial evidence suggests thatglucose or a metabolite may activate release of the neurotransmitter acetylcholine in rats when they are engaged in learning. Consequently,the issue of nutrition and cognition becomes increasingly important in light of evidence that circulating glucose concentrations have substantial effects on brain and cognitive functions.

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Documento generato il 15/07/20 alle ore 08:48:31