Catalogo Articoli (Spogli Riviste)

OPAC HELP

Titolo:
TESTING HYPOTHESES CONCERNING THE PHENOTYPIC PLASTICITY OF ESCAPE PERFORMANCE IN FISH OF THE FAMILY COTTIDAE
Autore:
TEMPLE GK; JOHNSTON IA;
Indirizzi:
UNIV ST ANDREWS,SCH ENVIRONM & EVOLUTIONARY BIOL,GATTY MARINE LAB ST ANDREWS KY16 8LB FIFE SCOTLAND UNIV ST ANDREWS,SCH ENVIRONM & EVOLUTIONARY BIOL,GATTY MARINE LAB ST ANDREWS KY16 8LB FIFE SCOTLAND
Titolo Testata:
Journal of Experimental Biology
fascicolo: 3, volume: 201, anno: 1998,
pagine: 317 - 331
SICI:
0022-0949(1998)201:3<317:THCTPP>2.0.ZU;2-Q
Fonte:
ISI
Lingua:
ENG
Soggetto:
ANGELFISH PTEROPHYLLUM-EIMEKEI; MYOFIBRILLAR ATPASE ACTIVITY; GOLDFISH CARASSIUS-AURATUS; FAST-START PERFORMANCE; CARP CYPRINUS-CARPIO; TEMPERATURE-ACCLIMATION; MARINE FISH; MYOXOCEPHALUS-SCORPIUS; THERMAL-ACCLIMATION; SKELETAL-MUSCLE;
Keywords:
TEMPERATURE ACCLIMATION; FAST-STARTS; ESCAPE RESPONSE; HYPOTHESES; BENEFICIAL; FITNESS; SHORT-HEM SCULPIN; MYOXOCEPHALUS SCORPIUS; LONG-SPINED SEA SCORPION; TAURULUS BUBALIS;
Tipo documento:
Article
Natura:
Periodico
Settore Disciplinare:
Science Citation Index Expanded
Citazioni:
68
Recensione:
Indirizzi per estratti:
Citazione:
G.K. Temple e I.A. Johnston, "TESTING HYPOTHESES CONCERNING THE PHENOTYPIC PLASTICITY OF ESCAPE PERFORMANCE IN FISH OF THE FAMILY COTTIDAE", Journal of Experimental Biology, 201(3), 1998, pp. 317-331

Abstract

A knowledge of the natural history of two species of marine Cottidae was used to construct a set of complex a priori hypotheses to test theidea that seasonal temperature acclimation conferred a fitness advantage and to examine whether acclimation responses were constant throughdevelopment. The species studied were the short-horn sculpin (Myoxocephalus scorpius L.) and the long-spined sea scorpion (Tartulus bubalisEuphr.). Fast-start escape performance was measured as a proxy of fitness, and maximum body-length-specific speed ((U) over cap(max)) acceleration ((A) over cap(max)), and angular velocity (<(omega)over cap>(max)) cumulative turning angle (CTA) were quantified. Fish were acclimated to 5, 15 and 20 degrees C and filmed using high-speed cinematography at 0.8, 5.0, 15.0 and 20.0 degrees C. The following hypotheses weretested: (1) improvements in escape performance following acclimation to high temperature in adult short-horn sculpin that live offshore would involve a trade-off in performance at low temperature, (2) the escape response of the sea scorpion, which experiences large daily temperature variation, would exhibit low thermal sensitivity and be unchangedby acclimation between 5 and 15 degrees C, and (3) in short-horn sculpin, the ability to acclimate maximum speed thermally is acquired during ontogeny in parallel with the offshore migration of the late juvenile stage. At 20.0 degrees C, in adult short-horn sculpin, (U) over cap(max) (A) over cap(max) were 110% and 55% higher, respectively, in 15 degrees C than in 5 degrees C-acclimated fish. No evidence was obtained for improved fast-start performance at 0.8 degrees C or 5.0 degrees C following cold acclimation. In the long-spined sea scorpion, acclimation to 5 and 15 degrees C did not improve (U) over cap(max) or (A) over cap(max) compared with fish acutely exposed to these temperatures, although acclimation to 5 degrees C increased omega(max) (P=0.005). When tested over the most extreme thermal range found in the field, all variables were improved at a test temperature of 0.8 degrees C in 5 degrees C-compared with 15 degrees C-acclimated sea scorpion. Acclimation therefore appeared to be beneficial in some instances in both species. How this affects relative fitness is uncertain. The scaling of (U) over cap(max) with acclimation to 5 and 15 degrees C was examined in both species over the test range 5.0-15.0 degrees C. Temperature acclimation did not affect scaling relationships of (U) over cap(max) in long-spined sea scorpion ranging in total body length (L) from 45 to 160 mm. At a test temperature of 15.0 degrees C, the scaling of (U) over cap(max) for shorthorn sculpin ranging in total body length from 43 to 270 mm changed from aL(-0.98) in 5 degrees C-acclimated fish to aL(-0.50) (where a is the proportionality coefficient in the regression equation) in 15 degrees C-acclimated fish (P<0.01). In short-horn sculpin,therefore, the ability to modify escape performance with temperature acclimation was found to vary during ontogeny, potentially parallelinga migration from a more variable to a more stable thermal environment.

ASDD Area Sistemi Dipartimentali e Documentali, Università di Bologna, Catalogo delle riviste ed altri periodici
Documento generato il 22/09/20 alle ore 20:47:47