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Titolo:
HEALTH-INSURANCE AND ACCESS TO PRIMARY-CARE FOR CHILDREN
Autore:
NEWACHECK PW; STODDARD JJ; HUGHES DC; PEARL M;
Indirizzi:
UNIV CALIF SAN FRANCISCO,INST HLTH POLICY STUDIES,1388 SUTTER ST,SUITE 1100 SAN FRANCISCO CA 94109 UNIV CALIF SAN FRANCISCO,DEPT PEDIAT SAN FRANCISCO CA 94109 UNIV CALIF SAN FRANCISCO,DEPT FAMILY & COMMUNITY MED SAN FRANCISCO CA94109 UNIV WISCONSIN,DEPT PEDIAT MADISON WI 00000
Titolo Testata:
The New England journal of medicine
fascicolo: 8, volume: 338, anno: 1998,
pagine: 513 - 519
SICI:
0028-4793(1998)338:8<513:HAATPF>2.0.ZU;2-6
Fonte:
ISI
Lingua:
ENG
Soggetto:
UNITED-STATES; AMBULATORY CARE; MEDICAL-CARE; ADOLESCENTS; SERVICES; RACE;
Tipo documento:
Article
Natura:
Periodico
Settore Disciplinare:
Science Citation Index Expanded
Citazioni:
21
Recensione:
Indirizzi per estratti:
Citazione:
P.W. Newacheck et al., "HEALTH-INSURANCE AND ACCESS TO PRIMARY-CARE FOR CHILDREN", The New England journal of medicine, 338(8), 1998, pp. 513-519

Abstract

Background Numerous studies have demonstrated that insurance status influences the amount of ambulatory care received by children, but few have assessed the role of insurance as a determinant of children's access to primary care. We studied the effect of health insurance on children's access to primary care. Methods We analyzed a sample of 49,367 children under 18 years of, age from the 1993-1994 National Health Interview Survey, a nationwide household survey. The overall rate of response was 86.5 percent. The survey included questions on insurance coverage and access to primary care. Results An estimated 13 percent of U.S. children did not have health insurance in 1993-1994. Uninsured children were less likely than insured children to have a usual source of care (75.9 percent vs. 96.2 percent, P<0.001). Among those with a usual source of care, uninsured children were more likely than insured children to have no regular physician (24.3 percent vs. 13.8 percent, P<0.001), to be without ac cess to medical care after normal business hours (11.8 percent vs. 7.0 percent, P<0.001), and to have families that were dissatisfied with at least one aspect of their care (19.6 percentvs. 14.0 percent, P=0.01). Uninsured children were more likely than insured children to have gone without needed medical, dental, or other health care (22.2 percent vs. 6.1 percent, P<0.001). Uninsured children were also less likely than insured children to have had contact witha physician during the previous year (67.4 percent vs. 83.8 percent, P<0.001). All differences remained significant after we controlled forpotential confounders using linear and logistic regression. Conclusions Among children, having health insurance is strongly associated withaccess to primary care. The new children's health insurance program enacted as part of the Balanced Budget Act of 1997 may substantially improve access to and use of primary care by children. (C) 1998, Massachusetts Medical Society.

ASDD Area Sistemi Dipartimentali e Documentali, Università di Bologna, Catalogo delle riviste ed altri periodici
Documento generato il 09/07/20 alle ore 13:07:46