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Titolo:
ANALYSES OF USE OF TRANQUILIZERS AND SLEEPING PILLS ACROSS 5 SURVEYS OF THE SAME POPULATION (1985-1991) - THE RELATIONSHIP WITH GENDER, AGEAND USE OF OTHER SUBSTANCES
Autore:
GRAHAM K; VIDALZEBALLOS D;
Indirizzi:
ADDICT RES FDN,100 COLLIP CIRCLE,SUITE 200 LONDON ON N6G 4X8 CANADA
Titolo Testata:
Social science & medicine
fascicolo: 3, volume: 46, anno: 1998,
pagine: 381 - 395
SICI:
0277-9536(1998)46:3<381:AOUOTA>2.0.ZU;2-1
Fonte:
ISI
Lingua:
ENG
Soggetto:
TERM BENZODIAZEPINE USERS; PSYCHOTROPIC-DRUG USE; ELDERLY PEOPLE; HIP FRACTURE; OLDER WOMEN; HALF-LIFE; RISK; DEPENDENCE; INSOMNIA; FALLS;
Keywords:
TRANQUILIZERS; SLEEPING PILLS; CROSS-SURVEY PATTERNS; GENDER; AGE;
Tipo documento:
Article
Natura:
Periodico
Settore Disciplinare:
Physical, Chemical & Earth Sciences
Physical, Chemical & Earth Sciences
Citazioni:
56
Recensione:
Indirizzi per estratti:
Citazione:
K. Graham e D. Vidalzeballos, "ANALYSES OF USE OF TRANQUILIZERS AND SLEEPING PILLS ACROSS 5 SURVEYS OF THE SAME POPULATION (1985-1991) - THE RELATIONSHIP WITH GENDER, AGEAND USE OF OTHER SUBSTANCES", Social science & medicine, 46(3), 1998, pp. 381-395

Abstract

The present study used analyses of data from five surveys of the samepopulation over a 6-year period to examine the relationship of use oftranquilizers/sleeping pills with gender, age and use of other psychoactive substances. Part of the study involved identifying methodological issues in using surveys to study tranquilizer/sleeping pill use. Across surveys and within all age groups, females were more likely to use tranquilizers and/or sleeping pills than males, with an average ratio overall of a little higher than three to two (varying across surveysfrom 1.4 to 2.1; mode of 1.6). Prevalence rates for both females and males were strongly affected by timeframe over which use was measured. Use of tranquilizers/sleeping pills increased with age; however, the relationship with age was different for tranquilizers than for sleeping pills. For tranquilizers, the high correlation between age and use was largely attributable to the low rate of use by those aged 34 and younger. For sleeping pills, on the other hand, the relationship is based more on the high rate of use by those aged 65 and older. In addition, age was a major factor in nonmedical use of tranquilizers/sleeping pills, with nonmedical use decreasing dramatically with age. Use of other types of psychoactive medications was significantly higher among tranquilizer/sleeping pill users than among non-users. The results pertaining to concurrent use of tranquilizers/sleeping pills and alcohol, marijuana, and tobacco, however, showed some trends, but findings were not consistent across all surveys. Further analyses suggested that this lack of consistent findings might be attributable to survey design issues, in particular, the extent that the format of the survey question tended to exclude nonmedical users. The implications of these results for future research on tranquilizer/sleeping pill use are discussed. (C) 1997 Published by Elsevier Science Ltd. All rights reserved.

ASDD Area Sistemi Dipartimentali e Documentali, Università di Bologna, Catalogo delle riviste ed altri periodici
Documento generato il 13/07/20 alle ore 20:08:27