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Titolo:
Kids at risk: Where American children sit in passenger vehicles
Autore:
Glass, RJ; Graham, JD;
Indirizzi:
Harvard Univ, Ctr Risk Anal, Cambridge, MA 02138 USA Harvard Univ Cambridge MA USA 02138 tr Risk Anal, Cambridge, MA 02138 USA HarvardAUniv, Sch Publ Hlth, Div Publ Hlth Practice, Cambridge, MA 02138 US Harvard Univ Cambridge MA USA 02138 Hlth Practice, Cambridge, MA 02138 US
Titolo Testata:
JOURNAL OF SAFETY RESEARCH
fascicolo: 1, volume: 30, anno: 1999,
pagine: 17 - 24
SICI:
0022-4375(199921)30:1<17:KARWAC>2.0.ZU;2-Q
Fonte:
ISI
Lingua:
ENG
Keywords:
passenger-side airbags; children and airbags; fatal crashes; front seat passengers;
Tipo documento:
Article
Natura:
Periodico
Settore Disciplinare:
Social & Behavioral Sciences
Citazioni:
16
Recensione:
Indirizzi per estratti:
Indirizzo: Glass, RJ Harvard Univ, Ctr Risk Anal, Cambridge, MA 02138 USA Harvard Univ Cambridge MA USA 02138 al, Cambridge, MA 02138 USA
Citazione:
R.J. Glass e J.D. Graham, "Kids at risk: Where American children sit in passenger vehicles", J SAFETY R, 30(1), 1999, pp. 17-24

Abstract

The risks that passenger-side airbags pose for children have caused renewed interest in where children should sit in motor vehicles. This study examines where children (dead or surviving) were sitting in passenger vehicles when fatal crashes occurred in the United States during the years 1985-1996. The major findings are that: (a) roughly one-third (32.5%) of children under the age of 13 in cars and minivans were seated in the front seat; (b) this behavior was most frequent among infants (45.4%); and (c) this behavior was more frequent when children were the only passengers in the vehicle (55.9%). Over the 12-year period analyzed, the percentage of children in the front seat has declined steadily among infants and toddlers but not among young children and subteens. The percentage of children in the front seat ranged from 40.0% in Massachusetts to 24.0% in Hawaii. When a child was seatedin the front, the rear seat was completely empty in 65% of the crashes andcompletely full only 4% of the time. More systematic study of child seating behaviors is recommended. (C) 1999 National Safety Council and Elsevier Science Ltd.

ASDD Area Sistemi Dipartimentali e Documentali, Università di Bologna, Catalogo delle riviste ed altri periodici
Documento generato il 28/11/20 alle ore 18:48:51