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Titolo:
Identifying objects in conventional and contorted poses: contributions of hemisphere-specific mechanisms
Autore:
Laeng, B; Shah, J; Kosslyn, S;
Indirizzi:
Harvard Univ, Cambridge, MA 02138 USA Harvard Univ Cambridge MA USA 02138Harvard Univ, Cambridge, MA 02138 USA Univ Tromso, Dept Psychol, N-9037 Tromso, Norway Univ Tromso Tromso Norway N-9037 so, Dept Psychol, N-9037 Tromso, Norway
Titolo Testata:
COGNITION
fascicolo: 1, volume: 70, anno: 1999,
pagine: 53 - 85
SICI:
0010-0277(19990201)70:1<53:IOICAC>2.0.ZU;2-G
Fonte:
ISI
Lingua:
ENG
Soggetto:
CEREBRAL HEMISPHERE; SPECIALIZATION; REPRESENTATIONS; LATERALIZATION; ORGANIZATION; RECOGNITION; PERCEPTION; FEATURES; VISION;
Keywords:
object identification; spatial cognition; categorical spatial relations; cerebral lateralization;
Tipo documento:
Article
Natura:
Periodico
Settore Disciplinare:
Social & Behavioral Sciences
Citazioni:
43
Recensione:
Indirizzi per estratti:
Indirizzo: Laeng, B Harvard Univ, Cambridge, MA 02138 USA Harvard Univ Cambridge MA USA 02138 niv, Cambridge, MA 02138 USA
Citazione:
B. Laeng et al., "Identifying objects in conventional and contorted poses: contributions of hemisphere-specific mechanisms", COGNITION, 70(1), 1999, pp. 53-85

Abstract

Three experiments were designed to rest the hypothesis that different mechanisms are used to encode objects seen in unfamiliar contortions than are used to encode objects seen in conventional poses. When a familiar non-rigidform (e.g. an animal) is seen in a contorted pose, we hypothesize that object identification may be achieved by (1) encoding the object's parts separately, (2) encoding the spatial relations among the parts, and (3) matchingthese encodings to a stored structural description. However, once this form has become familiar, its global shape can be directly matched to information stored in memory. Based on the idea that 'categorical' spatial relations are encoded better by the left cerebral hemisphere and are used in structural descriptions, we predicted a left-hemisphere advantage when one first encodes contorted poses; in contrast, based on the idea that overall shapesare encoded better by the right hemisphere, we predicted a right-hemisphere advantage for encoding the same shapes after they are familiar. Three experiments confirmed these predictions, which supports the hypotheses that different visual mechanisms operate in the recognition of familiar and unfamiliar views of known non-rigid objects. Moreover, correlational analyses between visual-field differences in several perceptual tasks (matching whole pictures to names, body parts to the whole body, and judging categorical spatial relations) revealed that the degree and lateralization of categorical spatial encoding predicts the left hemisphere's initial advantage in the identification of contorted shapes. (C) 1999 Elsevier Science B.V. All rightsreserved.

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Documento generato il 01/04/20 alle ore 11:23:38