Catalogo Articoli (Spogli Riviste)

OPAC HELP

Titolo:
Functional reach: Does it really measure dynamic balance?
Autore:
Wernick-Robinson, M; Krebs, DE; Giorgetti, MM;
Indirizzi:
Massachusetts Gen Hosp, Biomot Lab, Boston, MA 02114 USA Massachusetts GenHosp Boston MA USA 02114 omot Lab, Boston, MA 02114 USA Massachusetts Gen Hosp, Phys Therapy Dept, Boston, MA 02114 USA Massachusetts Gen Hosp Boston MA USA 02114 apy Dept, Boston, MA 02114 USA Massachusetts,Gen Hosp, Inst Hlth Profess Grad Program Phys Therapy, Boston Massachusetts Gen Hosp Boston MA USA 02114 d Program Phys Therapy, Boston
Titolo Testata:
ARCHIVES OF PHYSICAL MEDICINE AND REHABILITATION
fascicolo: 3, volume: 80, anno: 1999,
pagine: 262 - 269
SICI:
0003-9993(199903)80:3<262:FRDIRM>2.0.ZU;2-J
Fonte:
ISI
Lingua:
ENG
Soggetto:
STIMULUS PARAMETERS; REHABILITATION; RESPONSES; STRATEGIES; DISORDERS; AGE;
Tipo documento:
Article
Natura:
Periodico
Settore Disciplinare:
Clinical Medicine
Citazioni:
36
Recensione:
Indirizzi per estratti:
Indirizzo: Wernick-Robinson, M MassachusettsSAen Hosp, PT Serv, WACC 128,15 Parkman St, Boston, MA 02114 U Massachusetts Gen Hosp WACC 128,15 Parkman St Boston MA USA 02114
Citazione:
M. Wernick-Robinson et al., "Functional reach: Does it really measure dynamic balance?", ARCH PHYS M, 80(3), 1999, pp. 262-269

Abstract

Background: Functional reach (FR) is a new clinical measurement intended to assess dynamic balance. The purposes of this study were (1) to measure the mean FR distance in healthy elders compared with individuals with known balance impairments, (2) to analyze the extent to which FR measures dynamic balance, and (3) to describe movement strategies used during FR. Methods: Thirteen healthy elders and 15 individuals with vestibular hypofunction (VH) were tested during FR and free gait. Whole body kinematic and kinetic data including the center of gravity (CG) and center of pressure (CP) using 11 body segments and two force plates, respectively, were collected. Results: There was no difference in FR distance between healthy elders andindividuals with VH. FR distance was not correlated to lateral stability measures, but was related to anterior-posterior postural control measures ofFR (r = .69 to .84) in both groups. Although FR distance strongly correlated with maximum moment arm during FR in both groups, the correlations were not as strong when the subjects were then classified by movement strategy. The mean moment arm during FR was significantly less than that of free gait. Conclusions: These data suggest FR does not measure dynamic balance; healthy elders and balance-impaired individuals with vestibular dysfunction attained the same FR distance and did so without increasing the moment arm during or at the end of FR. Recording the strategy used during FR, however, mayprovide other valuable information necessary in addressing balance control. Clinical implications of assessing movement strategy are discussed. (C) 1999 by the American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine and the American Academy of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation.

ASDD Area Sistemi Dipartimentali e Documentali, Università di Bologna, Catalogo delle riviste ed altri periodici
Documento generato il 27/01/20 alle ore 18:04:44