Catalogo Articoli (Spogli Riviste)

OPAC HELP

Titolo:
Category-specific recognition impairments: a review of important case studies and influential theories
Autore:
Forde, EME; Humphreys, GW;
Indirizzi:
Aston Univ, Inst Psychol, Birmingham B4 7ET, W Midlands, England Aston Univ Birmingham W Midlands England B4 7ET 7ET, W Midlands, England Univ Birmingham, Birmingham, W Midlands, England Univ Birmingham Birmingham W Midlands England ngham, W Midlands, England
Titolo Testata:
APHASIOLOGY
fascicolo: 3, volume: 13, anno: 1999,
pagine: 169 - 193
SICI:
0268-7038(199903)13:3<169:CRIARO>2.0.ZU;2-B
Fonte:
ISI
Lingua:
ENG
Soggetto:
SEMANTIC MEMORY; LIVING THINGS; DOUBLE DISSOCIATION; MULTIPLE SEMANTICS; OBJECT RECOGNITION; NAMING IMPAIRMENTS; NONLIVING THINGS; NEURAL BASIS; KNOWLEDGE; RETRIEVAL;
Tipo documento:
Review
Natura:
Periodico
Settore Disciplinare:
Clinical Medicine
Citazioni:
73
Recensione:
Indirizzi per estratti:
Indirizzo: Forde, EME Astongland, Inst Psychol, Aston Triangle, Birmingham B4 7ET, W Midlands, En Aston Univ Aston Triangle Birmingham W Midlands England B4 7ET
Citazione:
E.M.E. Forde e G.W. Humphreys, "Category-specific recognition impairments: a review of important case studies and influential theories", APHASIOLOGY, 13(3), 1999, pp. 169-193

Abstract

Patients with category-specific recognition impairments for living and nonliving things have played a crucial role in developing current theories of semantic memory and object recognition. This paper reviews a number of the classic cases and discusses the theories that have been developed to account for these impairments. The first reports of patients with category-specific recognition impairments for living and non-living things were documentedby Nielsen, who argued that they arose because living and non-living things were stored in functionally (and anatomically) separate systems. Althoughthis hypothesis has been reiterated in some recent papers, the most widespread View has been that they emerge because living and non-living things have contrasting processing demands. The latter accounts include those which stress the relative importance of: the 'weighting' of sensory and functional features associated with living and non-living things the role of structural similarity between objects; the role of direct experience with objects;direct links between perceptual and functional features; and category structure. These theories are reviewed before outlining our own view on why category-specific recognition impairments emerge following brain damage.

ASDD Area Sistemi Dipartimentali e Documentali, Università di Bologna, Catalogo delle riviste ed altri periodici
Documento generato il 19/09/20 alle ore 12:55:26