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Titolo:
Neural activity of supplementary and primary motor areas in monkeys and its relation to bimanual and unimanual movement sequences
Autore:
Kazennikov, O; Hyland, B; Corboz, M; Babalian, A; Rouiller, EM; Wiesendanger, M;
Indirizzi:
Inselspital Bern, Dept Neurol, Motor Syst Lab, CH-3010 Bern, Switzerland Inselspital Bern Bern Switzerland CH-3010 Lab, CH-3010 Bern, Switzerland Russian Acad Sci, Inst Problems Informat Transmiss, Moscow, Russia RussianAcad Sci Moscow Russia blems Informat Transmiss, Moscow, Russia Univ Otago, Sch Med, Dept Physiol, Dunedin, New Zealand Univ Otago Dunedin New Zealand Med, Dept Physiol, Dunedin, New Zealand CHU, Serv Neurol, CH-1211 Geneva, Switzerland CHU Geneva Switzerland CH-1211 Serv Neurol, CH-1211 Geneva, Switzerland Univ Fribourg, CH-1700 Fribourg, Switzerland Univ Fribourg Fribourg Switzerland CH-1700 CH-1700 Fribourg, Switzerland Inst Physiol, CH-1700 Fribourg, Switzerland Inst Physiol Fribourg Switzerland CH-1700 CH-1700 Fribourg, Switzerland
Titolo Testata:
NEUROSCIENCE
fascicolo: 3, volume: 89, anno: 1999,
pagine: 661 - 674
SICI:
0306-4522(199903)89:3<661:NAOSAP>2.0.ZU;2-3
Fonte:
ISI
Lingua:
ENG
Soggetto:
PARKINSONS-DISEASE SUBJECTS; MEDIAL PREMOTOR CORTEX; CEREBRAL BLOOD-FLOW; LOAD-LIFTING TASK; FUNCTIONAL-ORGANIZATION; AFFERENT INFORMATION; SOMATOSENSORY CORTEX; VOLUNTARY MOVEMENTS; LEARNED MOVEMENTS; NEURONAL-ACTIVITY;
Keywords:
bimanual coordination; supplementary motor area; motor cortex; single units; motor skill; monkey;
Tipo documento:
Article
Natura:
Periodico
Settore Disciplinare:
Life Sciences
Citazioni:
71
Recensione:
Indirizzi per estratti:
Indirizzo: Wiesendanger, M InselspitalzerlandDept Neurol, Motor Syst Lab, BHH-M130, CH-3010 Bern, Swit Inselspital Bern BHH-M130 Bern Switzerland CH-3010 , Swit
Citazione:
O. Kazennikov et al., "Neural activity of supplementary and primary motor areas in monkeys and its relation to bimanual and unimanual movement sequences", NEUROSCIENC, 89(3), 1999, pp. 661-674

Abstract

A chronic single-unit study of motor cortical activity was undertaken in two monkeys trained to perform a bimanually coordinated task. The hypothesiswas tested that the supplementary motor area plays a specific role in coordinating the two hands for common goal-oriented actions. With this objective, a special search was made for neurons that might exhibit properties exclusively related to bimanual task performance. Monkeys learned to reach for and to pull open a spring-loaded drawer with one hand, while the other handreached out to grasp food from the drawer recess. The two hands were precisely coordinated for achievement of this goal. Monkeys also performed, in separate blocks of trials, only the pulling or grasping movements, using thesame hands as in the bimanual task. Task-related activity of 348 neurons from the supplementary motor area and 341 neurons from the primary motor area, each examined in the bimanual and in both unimanual tasks, was recorded in the two hemispheres. Most neurons from the supplementary motor area wererecorded within its caudal microexcitable portion. Contrary to expectation, the proportion of neurons with activity patterns related exclusively to the bimanual task was small, but somewhat higher in the supplementary motor area (5%) than in the primary motor cortex (2%). Another group of neurons that were equally modulated during the bimanual as well as to both unimanualtask components might also contribute in controlling bimanual actions. Such "task-dependent" rather than "effector-dependent" activity patterns were more common in neurons of the supplementary motor area (19%) than of the primary motor cortex (5%). Bilateral receptive fields were also more numerousamong the supplementary motor area neurons. However, a large majority of neurons from primary and supplementary motor areas had activity profiles clearly related only to contralateral hand movements (65% in the primary motorand 51% in the supplementary motor area). A similar group of neurons showed an additional slight modulation with ipsilateral movements; they were equally common in the two areas (14% and 16%, respectively) and their significance for bimanual coordination is questionable. Summed activity profiles ofall neurons recorded in the primary and supplementary motor areas of the same hemisphere were compared. The modulations of the three histograms, corresponding to the two unimanual and the bimanual tasks, were similar for thetwo motor areas, i.e. prominent with bimanual and contralateral movements and weak with ipsilateral movements. It is concluded that the supplementary motor area is likely to contribute to bimanual coordination, perhaps more than the primary motor cortex, but that it is not a defining function for the former cortical area. Instead, itis suggested that the supplementary motor area is part of a callosally interconnected and distributed network of frontal and parietal cortical areas that together orchestrate bimanual coordination. (C) 1999 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Science Ltd.

ASDD Area Sistemi Dipartimentali e Documentali, Università di Bologna, Catalogo delle riviste ed altri periodici
Documento generato il 04/12/20 alle ore 16:45:28