Catalogo Articoli (Spogli Riviste)

OPAC HELP

Titolo:
HABITUAL SLEEP PATTERNS AND RISK FOR STROKE AND CORONARY HEART-DISEASE - A 10-YEAR FOLLOW-UP FROM NHANES-I
Autore:
QURESHI AI; GILES WH; CROFT JB; BLIWISE DL;
Indirizzi:
CTR DIS CONTROL & PREVENT,CARDIOVASC HLTH STUDIES BRANCH ATLANTA GA 30341 CTR DIS CONTROL & PREVENT,CARDIOVASC HLTH STUDIES BRANCH ATLANTA GA 30341 EMORY UNIV,SCH MED,DEPT NEUROL,SLEEP DISORDERS CTR ATLANTA GA 30322
Titolo Testata:
Neurology
fascicolo: 4, volume: 48, anno: 1997,
pagine: 904 - 911
SICI:
0028-3878(1997)48:4<904:HSPARF>2.0.ZU;2-3
Fonte:
ISI
Lingua:
ENG
Soggetto:
DAYTIME SLEEPINESS; APNEA SYNDROME; INTRACRANIAL HEMODYNAMICS; ALAMEDA COUNTY; POPULATION; DISORDERS; HYPERTENSION; INFARCTION; MORTALITY; DISTURBANCES;
Tipo documento:
Article
Natura:
Periodico
Settore Disciplinare:
Science Citation Index Expanded
Citazioni:
71
Recensione:
Indirizzi per estratti:
Citazione:
A.I. Qureshi et al., "HABITUAL SLEEP PATTERNS AND RISK FOR STROKE AND CORONARY HEART-DISEASE - A 10-YEAR FOLLOW-UP FROM NHANES-I", Neurology, 48(4), 1997, pp. 904-911

Abstract

Background: Habitual sleep patterns may independently affect morbidity and mortality. However, the effect of habitual sleep patterns on therisk for stroke and coronary heart disease is unclear. Methods: We evaluated the association between sleep duration and daytime somnolence (often or almost always taking daytime naps) with the incidence of stroke and coronary heart disease in a national cohort of 7,844 adults who participated in the First National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey Epidemiologic Follow-up Study. Cox proportional hazards analyses were used to examine these relationships during the 10-year follow-up. Results: After adjusting for differences in age, race, gender, education, cigarette smoking, body mass index, serum cholesterol, systolicblood pressure, and diabetes mellitus, the risk for stroke was increased in persons who reported sleeping greater than 8 hours at night compared with persons who slept between 6 and 8 hours (relative risk [RR]= 1.5, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.1 to 2.0). Daytime somnolencewas also associated with stroke incidence (RR = 1.4; 95% CI = 1.1 to 1.8). Persons who reported both greater than 8 hours of sleep and daytime somnolence were at the greatest risk for stroke (RR = 1.9, 95% CI = 1.2 to 3.1). Similar results were also found for coronary heart disease, although the results did not reach statistical significance in the multivariate adjusted model. Conclusions: Habitual sleep patterns have significant effects on the risk for stroke.

ASDD Area Sistemi Dipartimentali e Documentali, Università di Bologna, Catalogo delle riviste ed altri periodici
Documento generato il 07/07/20 alle ore 12:06:02