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Titolo:
Theophylline for irreversible chronic airflow limitation - A randomized study comparing n of 1 trials to standard practice
Autore:
Mahon, JL; Laupacis, A; Hodder, RV; McKim, DA; Paterson, NAM; Wood, TE; Donner, A;
Indirizzi:
Univ Western Ontario, Dept Med, London, ON N6A 3K7, Canada Univ Western Ontario London ON Canada N6A 3K7 London, ON N6A 3K7, Canada Univ Western Ontario, Dept Epidemiol & Biostat, London, ON N6A 3K7, CanadaUniv Western Ontario London ON Canada N6A 3K7 London, ON N6A 3K7, Canada Univ Ottawa, Dept Med, Ottawa, ON, Canada Univ Ottawa Ottawa ON CanadaUniv Ottawa, Dept Med, Ottawa, ON, Canada
Titolo Testata:
CHEST
fascicolo: 1, volume: 115, anno: 1999,
pagine: 38 - 48
SICI:
0012-3692(199901)115:1<38:TFICAL>2.0.ZU;2-#
Fonte:
ISI
Lingua:
ENG
Soggetto:
OBSTRUCTIVE PULMONARY-DISEASE; ORALLY-ADMINISTERED THEOPHYLLINE; AIR-FLOW OBSTRUCTION; INDIVIDUAL PATIENTS; CLINICAL USEFULNESS; EXERCISE CAPACITY; N-OF-1 TRIALS; STABLE COPD; COMBINATION; SALBUTAMOL;
Keywords:
irreversible chronic airflow limitations; n of 1 trials; randomized trial; theophylline;
Tipo documento:
Article
Natura:
Periodico
Settore Disciplinare:
Clinical Medicine
Life Sciences
Citazioni:
32
Recensione:
Indirizzi per estratti:
Indirizzo: Mahon, JL UnivALondon London Hosp, Rm 6OF11,POB 5339,339 Windermere Rd, London, ON N6 Univ London London Hosp Rm 6OF11,POB 5339,339 Windermere Rd London ON Canada N6A 5A5
Citazione:
J.L. Mahon et al., "Theophylline for irreversible chronic airflow limitation - A randomized study comparing n of 1 trials to standard practice", CHEST, 115(1), 1999, pp. 38-48

Abstract

Study objective: To compare quality of life and exercise capacity (primaryaim), and drug usage (secondary aim), between groups of patients with irreversible chronic airflow limitation (CAL) who were undergoing theophylline (Theo-Dur; Key Pharmaceuticals; Kenilworth, NJ) therapy guided by n of 1 trials or standard practice. Design: Randomized study of n of 1 trials vs standard practice. Setting: Outpatient departments in two tertiary care centers. Patients: Sixty-eight patients with irreversible CAL who were symptomatic despite the use of inhaled bronchodilators, and who were unsure whether theophylline was helping them following inhaled bronchodilators, and who were unsure whether theophylline was helping them following open treatment, wererandomized into n of 1 trials (N = 34) or standard practice. Interventions: the n of 1 trials (single-patients, randomized, double-blind, multiple crossover comparisons of the effect on dyspnea of theophylline vs a placebo) followed published guidelines. Standard practice patients stopped taking theophylline but resumed it if their dyspnea worsened. If theirdyspnea then improved, theophylline was continued. In both groups, a decision about continuing or stopping the use of theophylline was made within 3 months of randomization. Measurements and results: The primary outcomes (the chronic respiratory disease questionnaire [CRQ] and 6-min walk) were measured at baseline, 6 months, and 12 months by personnel blinded to treatment group allocation. No between-group differences (n of 1 minus standard practice) were seen in within-group seen in within-group changes over time (1 year minus baseline) in the CRQ Physical Function score (point estimate on the difference, -2.8; 95%confidence limits [CLs], -8.2, 2.5), CRQ Emotional Function score (point estimate on the difference, 0.5; 95% CLs, -4.7, 5.7), or 6-min walk (point estimate on the difference, 8 m; 95% CLs, -26, 44 m). No differences betweengroups were seen in the secondary outcome of the proportion of patients taking theophylline at 6 and 12 months. In 7 of 34 n of 1 trial patients (21%), dyspnea improved during theophylline treatment compared with placebo treatment. Conclusions: Using n of 1 trials to guide theophylline therapy in patientswith irreversible CAL did not improve their quality of life or exercise capacity, or reduce drug usage, over 1 year compared to standard practice. Under the objective conditions of an n of 1 trial, 21% of patients with CAL responded to theophylline. There remains a rationale for considering theophylline in patients with irreversible CAL who remain symptomatic despite the use of inhaled bronchodilators, but the use of n of 1 trials to guide this decision did not yield clinically important advantages over standard practice.

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Documento generato il 27/11/20 alle ore 13:32:25