Catalogo Articoli (Spogli Riviste)

OPAC HELP

Titolo:
Diabetes, hypertension, and central obesity as cataract risk factors in a black population - The Barbados Eye Study
Autore:
Leske, MC; Wu, SY; Hennis, A; Connell, AMS; Hyman, L; Schachat, A;
Indirizzi:
SUNY Stony Brook, Med Ctr, Dept Prevent Med, Stony Brook, NY 11794 USA SUNY Stony Brook Stony Brook NY USA 11794 Med, Stony Brook, NY 11794 USA Minist Hlth & Environm, Bridgetown, Barbados Minist Hlth & Environm Bridgetown Barbados vironm, Bridgetown, Barbados Univ W Indies, Sch Clin Med & Res, Bridgetown, Barbados Univ W Indies Bridgetown Barbados Clin Med & Res, Bridgetown, Barbados Johns Hopkins Univ, Sch Med, Wilmer Eye Inst, Baltimore, MD 21205 USA Johns Hopkins Univ Baltimore MD USA 21205 e Inst, Baltimore, MD 21205 USA
Titolo Testata:
OPHTHALMOLOGY
fascicolo: 1, volume: 106, anno: 1999,
pagine: 35 - 41
SICI:
0161-6420(199901)106:1<35:DHACOA>2.0.ZU;2-B
Fonte:
ISI
Lingua:
ENG
Soggetto:
POSTERIOR SUBCAPSULAR CATARACTS; OPACITIES CASE-CONTROL; OPEN-ANGLE GLAUCOMA; LENS OPACITIES; INSULIN-RESISTANCE; EPIDEMIOLOGIC ASSOCIATIONS; UNITED-STATES; PREVALENCE; MELLITUS; WHITES;
Tipo documento:
Article
Natura:
Periodico
Settore Disciplinare:
Clinical Medicine
Life Sciences
Citazioni:
53
Recensione:
Indirizzi per estratti:
Indirizzo: Leske, MC SUNY794ony Brook, Med Ctr, Dept Prevent Med, HSC L3 086, Stony Brook, NY 11 SUNY Stony Brook HSC L3 086 Stony Brook NY USA 11794 rook, NY 11
Citazione:
M.C. Leske et al., "Diabetes, hypertension, and central obesity as cataract risk factors in a black population - The Barbados Eye Study", OPHTHALMOL, 106(1), 1999, pp. 35-41

Abstract

Objective: The increased cataract prevalence of black populations, especially of cortical cataract, remains unexplained. The authors evaluate the 'relationships of diabetes, hypertension, and obesity patterns to lens opacities, by age, among 4314 black participants in the Barbados Eye Study. Design and Participants: Prevalence study of a random sample of the Barbados population, ages 40 to 84 years (84% participation). Main Outcome Measure: Associations with age-related lens changes (grade greater than or equal to 2 in the Lens Opacities Classification System II at the slit lamp) were evaluated in logistic regression analyses by age (persons <60 years and greater than or equal to 60 years), Results are presented as odds ratios (OR) with 95% confidence intervals. Results: Of the 1800 participants with lens changes, most had cortical opacities. Diabetes history (18% prevalence) was related to all lens changes, especially at younger ages (age <60 years. OR = 2.23 [1.63; 3.04]; age; greater than or equal to 60 years: OR = 1.63 [1.22, 2.17]). Diabetes also increased the risk of cortical opacities (age <60 years OR = 2.30 [1.63, 3.24];age greater than or equal to 60 years: OR = 1.42 [1.03, 1.96]); additionalrisk factors were high diastolic blood pressure (age <60 years: OR = 1.49 [1.00; 2.23]) and higher waist/hip ratio tall ages: OR = 1.36 [1.00, 1.84]). Diabetes was also related to posterior subcapsular opacities. Glycated hemoglobin levels were positively associated with cortical and posterior subcapsular opacities. Overall, 14% of the prevalence of lens changes could be attributed to diabetes. Conclusions: The high prevalence of cortical opacities was related to diabetes, hypertension, and abdominal obesity, which also are common in this and other black populations. Interventions to modify these risk factors, especially in populations in which they are highly prevalent, may have implications to control visual loss from cataract, which is the first cause of blindness worldwide.

ASDD Area Sistemi Dipartimentali e Documentali, Università di Bologna, Catalogo delle riviste ed altri periodici
Documento generato il 22/09/20 alle ore 14:08:44