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Titolo:
The Job Demand Control (-Support) model and physical health outcomes: A review of the strain and buffer hypothesis
Autore:
van der Doef, M; Maes, S;
Indirizzi:
Leiden Univ, NL-2300 RB Leiden, Netherlands Leiden Univ Leiden Netherlands NL-2300 RB NL-2300 RB Leiden, Netherlands
Titolo Testata:
PSYCHOLOGY & HEALTH
fascicolo: 5, volume: 13, anno: 1998,
pagine: 909 - 936
SICI:
0887-0446(1998)13:5<909:TJDC(M>2.0.ZU;2-X
Fonte:
ISI
Lingua:
ENG
Soggetto:
PSYCHOSOCIAL WORK-ENVIRONMENT; MYOCARDIAL-INFARCTION RISK; CORONARY HEART-DISEASE; LOW-BIRTH-WEIGHT; DECISION LATITUDE; SOCIAL SUPPORT; CARDIOVASCULAR-DISEASE; OCCUPATIONAL STRESS; PERCEIVED CONTROL; UNITED-STATES;
Keywords:
Job Demand-Control model; Job Demand-Control-Support model; job strain; physical health; review;
Tipo documento:
Article
Natura:
Periodico
Settore Disciplinare:
Social & Behavioral Sciences
Citazioni:
73
Recensione:
Indirizzi per estratti:
Indirizzo: van der Doef, M Leiden Univ, POB 9555, NL-2300 RB Leiden, Netherlands Leiden Univ POB 9555 Leiden Netherlands NL-2300 RB rlands
Citazione:
M. van der Doef e S. Maes, "The Job Demand Control (-Support) model and physical health outcomes: A review of the strain and buffer hypothesis", PSYCHOL HEA, 13(5), 1998, pp. 909-936

Abstract

This review of the Job Demand-Control (JDC) model and the expanded Jab Demand-Central Support (JDCS) model and employees' physical health, focuses onthe two prevalent views on these models. According to their view on the models researchers study different hypotheses: (a) the (iso)strain hypothesis, stating that the highest level of iii health is expected when the job is characterized by high demand and low control (and low social support), or (b) the buffer hypothesis, predicting that control (and social support) can buffer the potential negative effects of high demands on physical health. It is argued that these hypotheses reflect theoretical distinct models, and that the practical implications associated with these models differ. The review of 51 studies on the JDC(S) model reveals that the 'strain' hypothesis predominates in studies of all-cause mortality, cardiovascular disease (CVD) related and specific non-CVD related health outcomes. In contrast, the 'buffer' hypothesis is most prevalent in research on self-reported (psycho)somatic complaints. For the strain hypothesis as well as the buffer hypothesis the results are equivocal. Working in a high (iso)strain job appears to be associated with an elevated risk for cardiovascular disease and negative pregnancy outcomes, and increased (psycho)somatic complaints. Conclusions on other physical outcomes seem premature, considering the limited number of studies. The buffer hypothesis is supported in the few studies on CVD endpoints and in some studies on (psycho)somatic complaints. A comparison of the validity of the two hypotheses is problematic, becausethey are mostly applied to a different set of outcomes. Furthermore, the analyses employed in the testing of the two hypotheses are of a different nature (non-linear versus linear). The main recommendation for future research is to examine the validity of the strain and the buffer hypothesis concurrently, and to further explore the nature of the relationships.

ASDD Area Sistemi Dipartimentali e Documentali, Università di Bologna, Catalogo delle riviste ed altri periodici
Documento generato il 25/11/20 alle ore 04:25:27